Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

The program requirements fulfill the educational coursework for students who plan to teach children from birth through second grade without the Illinois Professional Licensure.

Major Requirements

28 semester hours (sh)

Course descriptions for all EDUC courses are available at the bottom of this page.

Full program requirements:

  • The curriculum is sequenced in six blocks:
  • Foundation Block 1:  EDUC 2120, 2140
  • Foundation Block 2:  EDUC 2140, 2145
  • Professional Method Courses Block 3:  EDUC 3180, 3130, 3430
  • Professional Method Courses Block 4:  EDUC 3360, 2300, 3930
  • Professional Method Courses Block 5:  EDUC 4970, 3130
  • Professional Method Courses Block 6:  EDUC 4970, Core 3000
  • English as a Second Language Courses:  EDUC 3540, 3601, 3602, 3603, 3604, and 3605

Academic Catalog

Core Curriculum

Course Descriptions

Click on the links below for course descriptions of the education courses.

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

This course is an introduction to the teaching profession. Topics covered include historical, philosophical, contemporary, and ethical perspectives on education as well as social and cultural expectations in teaching. In this introductory course, students are informed on the appropriate role of technology; state and national standards; policies governing education at the national, state, and local level; and careers and organizations related to teaching and education. This course also introduces students to state licensure requirements.


Basic principles of curriculum including, planning, organizing and developing lesson plans in relation to the individual learner, the school, and the society are discussed. Historical developments and recent innovations in school curriculum, lesson planning and preparation, and instructional delivery will be analyzed. Emphasis is on planning and preparation of lesson plans according to the School of Education lesson plan template aligned with the Danielson Domains, edTPA, Illinois Learning Standards and Common Core Standards. Needs of multi-cultural and special needs students are addressed. Electronic professional portfolios will be developed.


This course introduces students to research-based instructional strategies along with basic principles and practices of classroom assessment. Special attention will be given to differentiated instruction, maximizing student engagement and learning, formative and summative assessment practices, and the use of data in classroom decision-making.


Methods of dealing with the development of language in young children. The emphasis is on speaking and listening skills, and preparation for reading and writing skills.

Introduction to language and literacy development of young children related to reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Emphasis will be on the knowledge of alphabetic code, phonics, vocabulary, reading comprehension, fluency, organization of print, writing, and use of both narrative and informative text. The students will create instructional units that apply goals, learning standards, instructional strategies, and assessments to facilitate literacy and language development.


This course examines diversity in the classroom with attention to the linguistic, cultural, academic and cognitive dimensions of student development and learning. This course will also examine the instructional planning, instructional strategies and culturally responsive practices for diverse learners. Consideration will be given to the ways racial-ethnic segregation, ESL, bilingual, bicultural, and special education programs have impacted schools and their communities.


Survey of the psychology of the identification of, and the methods of instruction for the exceptional child, including the learning disabled, with special emphasis on characteristics and methods of instruction for cross-categorical special education students.


Methods and techniques of teaching mathematical, social, and scientific concepts to young children. The relation of learning theories to the selection process. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques and procedures.

This second instruction course prepares pre-service teachers to gain knowledge on mathematics and science content, instructional methods, and resources to teach early childhood. In mathematics, the emphasis is on emergent knowledge of numbers and operation, algebriac thinking, measurement of data and basic geometry. In science, the focus is on scientific inquiry on principles and knowledge of interrelationships among science. The pre-service teachers are expected to create, design, implement, and assess units that reflect the content.


Intensive study of developmental theory and research related to physical, cognitive, psychosocial, and faith development in infants and children. An experiential learning component is included.


Exploration of the role families and community services play in the education of young children. Teacher candidates will identify social, economic, and cultural trends that impact families of young children and will develop strategies to communicate with families to disseminate information regarding school and community services.

Exploration of the role families, schools, and community services play in the education of young children. The course will examine the social, economic, medical, financial and cultural trends that impact the partnership with families of all young children. The students will be required to design family workshops and find resources to involve family, school and community in the development and assessment of young children.


An assignment outside a school setting in a business or not-for-profit institution in which education is the primary goal. Please refer to the Internship section of the catalog for internship requirements and guidelines.


This course examines diversity in the classroom with attention to the linguistic, cultural, academic and cognitive dimensions of student development and learning. This course will also examine the instructional planning, instructional strategies and culturally responsive practices for diverse learners. Consideration will be given to the ways racial-ethnic segregation, ESL, bilingual, bicultural, and special education programs have impacted schools and their communities.


In the Capstone Seminar students join the entire campus community in examining one of several annual theme questions. These interdisciplinary seminars allow students to integrate their own intellectual interests into their understanding of the world and their place in it. Note: While these courses may be cross listed in a major department students must register for CORE 3000 to meet the requirement. A student may not receive credit for Keystone Seminar and credit in the major.


The purpose of this course is to observe and assist a teacher in an ESL school setting for a minimum total of 100 clock hours. The requirements for this course may also be met through certification of three months of teaching experience with ESL students. Only those who have verification by a principal or other administrators of three months of teaching ESL students prior to entering the program may take this for no credit. To be taken at the end of the five-course ESL course sequence.


Introduction to the basic principles of linguistics, the study of human language. Origins of language; what it means to know a language; comparisons of the difficulty levels of different languages; how children acquire language and common threads that may connect languages will be explored.


Exploration of various aspects of the relationship between language and society. Culture, sex differences, communities, dialects, and speech will be examined.


Philosophical and theoretical considerations for teaching a second language. An explanation of theories as well as comparisons among the different theories of teaching a second language will be explored. The student will build a personal framework for teaching a second language. Kindergarten through high school student populations will be the focus of attention including design and sequencing of ESL courses.


Assessment techniques of ESL students. Different types of assessment instruments, the theoretical viewpoints of these instruments, and testing procedures in general will be discussed. Assessment of all levels of proficiency and grade levels will be considered.


Introduction to the various methods of teaching a second language in K-12 based on the philosophies and theories that were presented in 3603. Strategies used when working with ESL or second language students and exposure to the issues of multicultural diversity and socioeconomic diversity.