Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Students completing the requirements for a bachelor of music (BM) degree in music in worship will be prepared for careers and graduate programs in sacred music performance and worship leading.

Major Requirements

90 hours of major coursework
4 years ensemble participation
46 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Minor Requirements:

20 semester hours

ACADEMIC CATALOG

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

This course is designed to offer students opportunities to listen to a variety of concerts and recitals, and to perform as soloists as well. In addition, guest artists conduct master classes on occasion during the Thursday afternoon sessions. Students registered for this course have a set number of requirements to attend General and Class Recitals that occur on Thursday afternoons, evening and weekend concerts, and recitals from the School of Music Concert Calendar. Students also have specific performance requirements associated with the General and Class Recitals.


A select group of wind, rhythm, and percussion players determined by audition. Repertoire includes music for large jazz groups from the big band era to the present. An on-campus concert is presented each term, along with occasional outside performances.


Open to all wind and percussion players, this group is dedicated to the performance of wind ensemble music, both original music and transcriptions. Performances include on-campus concerts each term.


A select group of experienced choristers, determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with regular national and foreign tours. The University Choir performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music. Cross-listed with MUS 5800.


A select group of female singers determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with national and foreign tours periodically. The Women's Chorale performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music.


A select ensemble of singers drawn from the larger Gospel Choir by audition. The repertoire features all forms of gospel as well as traditional spirituals. The emphasis is on off-campus performances with a major tour every other year.


This worship ensemble is chosen by audition and supervised by University Ministries and the Worship Arts Coordinator for the campus. Students are expected to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to planning and leading music in worship. Roles on the team include team leaders (planning, coordination, song selection), vocalists, instrumentalists, and communications liaison to other worship planning groups. Emphasis will be given to learning diverse worship styles and repertoire will include worship music from various traditions and cultural styles. Students will lead in weekly campus worship services as well as off-campus worship events.


Introduction to the Music Profession offers Bachelor of Arts or Music students to begin to make connections between their music study, the total academic program, and post-undergraduate activities. It will also provide a setting in which to share perceptions about intended professions; this process will then in turn create a supportive atmosphere to ease the transition from high school and prior artistic settings, to college, and eventually to the workplace. Guests who work in a variety of music fields will be invited to selected classes, and students will be assigned readings that will act as a basis for in-class discussions. Other goals of the course include an intensive focus on the ethical dimensions of the music profession, and an exploration of professional habits that will support success in the future.


For students with little or no piano study. Functional keyboard harmony, scales, transposition, simple score reading, sight-reading, improvisation, and repertoire. For music majors, minors, and concentrations. Placement by piano faculty.


For students with some piano study. Functional keyboard harmony, scales, transposition, simple score reading, sight-reading, improvisation, and repertoire. For music majors, minors, and concentrations.


For students with a minimum of 2-4 years of piano study. Functional keyboard harmony, scales, transposition, score reading, accompaniments, sight-reading, improvisation, repertoire, and skills required for specific majors. For music majors as required by degree track.


For students with a minimum of 3-5 years of piano study. A highly focused and practical approach to the performance of music materials commonly used in music education and worship programs. Areas of study include: advanced score reading using C clefs; transpositions, and keyboard improvisation. For music majors as required by degree track.


An introduction to basic skills and concepts that are foundational to further studies in music. Topics in music theory, aural skills, and keyboard harmony will be taught against the contextual background of a broad overview of stylistic periods in music history.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in diatonic music of graded difficulty.


Continuation of sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in a diatonic music of graded difficulty.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to more advanced music including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, intervals, an introduction of chromaticism in scale patterns, melodies, and harmony.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to advanced music including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, intervals in an atonal context, more advanced chromaticism in scale patterns, melodies, harmony, and formal analysis.


Study of basic elements of diatonic music. Topics include triadic harmony, non-chord tones, melodic organization, phrase structure, cadences.


Continuing study of the principles of diatonic music. Topics include elements of melodic structure; pitch and rhythm, embellishing tones, melodic form and composition, and part writing with triads and seventh chords.


An introduction to current software programs and their applications for music education, composition, and production. Music graphics, sequencing and pedagogical software and hardware will be used in this course.


Provides feedback and coaching for students involved in regular campus worship services. Team building, music selection, technical aspects and spiritual components of worship leading are discussed. May be repeated for credit or non-credit.


All students must register for this course in the semester of their Sophomore Conference.


This survey of the history of western music from the Baroque period through the mid-Romantic period is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.


This survey of the history of western music from the late Romantic period through the present time is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.


Study of principles of chromaticism in tonal music, including secondary functions, modulation, mode mixture, altered pre-dominants, and other advanced chromatic harmony. Formal analysis, introduction to counterpoint, study of inventions, and fugue. Short composition projects and analysis of 19th century works.


Harmonic studies in jazz and pop idioms. Literature analysis, harmonization of melodies, keyboard realization, and voicing. Projects include small arrangements and original compositions.


Beginning and intermediate conducting skills: beat patterns, baton technique, use of face, eyes, left hand; basic rehearsal planning; score preparation; psychology of conducting. An introduction to choral and instrumental methods and materials.


An advanced study of the conducting concepts covered in MUS 3170. A more in-depth exploration of choral and instrumental methods and materials for the purpose of developing skills in applied musicianship.


A survey of Christian sacred music meant to be performed by choirs (adult and children), organ, hand bells, and other ensembles, from various historical time periods and cultural groups, highlighting works appropriate for local church settings.


A survey of music for the gathered community to sing together in the context of Christian worship. Historical, contemporary, and global resources will be explored, including a survey of Christian hymnody, Taize, contemporary praise and worship, African American gospel, and songs from the world-wide church.


The Chamber Singers is a small, select group of singers, that performs music from many and diverse styles and periods. The goal for this ensemble is to function as a group of soloists in the true chamber style, performing music that profits from intimate renderings. Students participate in multiple performances both on and off campus including regular national and foreign tours. Auditions are competitive and based on the needs of the ensemble. Cross-listed with MUS 5890.


A study of the ranges, techniques, timbres, and scoring of traditional orchestral instruments. Arranging for small instrumental ensembles is emphasized.


Practical techniques of arranging music for a variety of vocal and instrumental mediums and in a variety of stylistic genres. Focus on arranging for small ensembles found both in school and church contexts.


Introduction to biblical foundations for Christian worship and a survey of the wide spectrum of practices and theology expressed in worship arts, especially music. Visits and observation of Chicago area congregations. The use of aesthetic judgment in evaluating music and art used in worship. The worship leader's role as educator and change agent in the context of a servant leadership model. Students develop evaluative tools to facilitate these goals and articulate a personal philosophy of church music ministry.


Students have an opportunity to work with a variety of professional organizations, including churches, in fields such as radio, arts management and church choir/music ministry leadership. Please see the internship section of the catalog for requirements and guidelines.




Principles of breath control, tone placement, and correct diction aiming toward technical mastery of standard vocal literature. Repertoire for four years includes art songs in English, Italian, German, and French and the standard sacred solos as well as arias from opera and oratorios.







Students required by their degree tracks to perform recitals should register for this course in the semester in which the recital is performed, most typically during the senior year.


This course, typically offered in the fall semester, is an introduction to foundational biblical themes and understandings of Christian spiritual formation with an emphasis on Christian faith as a journey. This course will seek to integrate the individual and communal elements of spiritual formation, and the personal and public character of the Christian life with an understanding of the student's personal formation journey. The intent of the course is practical, experiential, and formational. Included in the course will be both a teaching component and formation sessions facilitated by a formation leader. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Music in Worship students only.


This course, typically offered in the spring semester, introduces students to a variety of classical and contemporary spiritual practices that are meant to invite the student into a deeper sense of God's presence in their interior lives and in the world around them. The biblical and historical contexts for spiritual practices will be explored and discussed in and out of class session. Spiritual practices will include, but are not limited to, biblical prayer, centering prayer, hospitality, praying and working for justice, self-examination and discernment. The intent of the course is practical, experiential, and formational. Included in the course will be both teaching component and formation group sessions facilitated by a formation leader. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Music in Worship students only.


This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field known as liturgical studies. The course explores the history of Christian worship, liturgical theology, the place of ritual in the life of faith, as well as the application of a praxis-theory-praxis model to the worship concerns of pastoral ministry.


This course will consider the use of the arts in worship using historical examples and liturgical theology paradigms. It will provide a background on each of the worship arts; music, drama, dance, visual arts, media, and architecture/environment. Each art form will be reviewed with suggestions for resources, opportunities to plan and use the different art forms and frameworks for working together in teams and supervising the worship arts. Criteria for theological, liturgical, and aesthetic assessment will be included. The relationship between pastors, worship leaders and worship arts coordinators and the pastoral aspects of leading worship arts teams will all be considered. The course also includes a significant worship team planning and worship leading components applied in the context of the seminary chapel.


This is a topics course allowing the BTS department to grant credit for selected courses taken at North Park Theological Seminary.