North Park University - Chicago North Park University - Chicago

Undergraduate Programs

Program Requirements

Students who complete the major requirements for a bachelor of arts (BA) in engineering from the Department of Physics and Engineering will acquire a basic understanding of science and technology and how it is employed in a wide range of disciplines and fields.

Major Requirements

ACADEMIC PLANNING GUIDE

CORE CURRICULUM

ACADEMIC CATALOG

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

Beginning calculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, mean value theorem, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives, Riemann Sums, introduction to the definite integrals. Uses computers. Lab included. Student should have completed four years of high school math.


This course is the first semester of a calculus-based introductory physics course for science majors. Topics to be covered include kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, rotational motion, gravitation, equilibria, properties of materials, fluids, wave motion, sound, and simple harmonic oscillations. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills as well as conceptual understanding of the material. Lab is included in this course. Basic knowledge of trigonometry is assumed. Calculus is recommended.


This course is the second semester of a calculus-based introductory physics course for science majors. Topics to be covered include thermodynamics, electrical fields and forces, electric potential, DC circuits, magnetic fields and forces, AC circuits, geometrical and physical optics, quantum theory, atomic theory and structure, and nuclear structure, decay, and reactions. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills as well as conceptual understanding of the material. Lab is included in this course.


Analysis of polynomial, rational, algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.


Continuation of MATH 1510. Fundamental theorem of calculus, evaluation of definite integrals, applications of definite integrals, introduction to differential equations, infinite sequences and series. Uses computers. Lab included.


Introduction to applied statistical analysis. Descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics; concepts of population, sample, sampling distribution; elements of probability; parameters of discrete distributions; hypothesis testing: analysis of proportions, means, and variance; linear regression. Computer applications required. Cross-listed with MATH 1490.


Explores how biological mechanisms interact with experience to create behavior, with an emphasis on components of the nervous system and the biological bases of the sensory systems.


Examines some of the basic processes of behavior and mental life: classical and operant conditioning, memory, and thinking. Combines experimental data, everyday experience, and psychological theory.


Introduces the study of human behavior in groups, including social cognition, social influence, attribution, social comparison, attraction and friendship, stereotypes, and the self. The course incorporates theory, research, and application.


Studies psychological disorders, etiologies, assessment, and interventions. This includes the history of abnormal psychology; theory and research; and biological, psychological, and social approaches to treatment.


Studies the relationship between the external world and our internal representation of the world as we perceive it. Considers the bases of accurate perception, factors contributing to perceptual errors, the dimensions and processes of consciousness, and the nature of reality.


Examines the nature and origin of human language and what is known about how humans speak, listen, comprehend, converse, and read, as well as how language influences other aspects of cognition. Included are the neurological and social underpinnings of language, time-course of acquisition, sign language, bilingualism, and animal language.


A presentation of the basic laws of chemistry with emphasis on stoichiometry, atomic and electronic structure, bonding, and the states of matter(gas, liquid, solid, and solution). Properties and reactions of some elements and simple compounds are used to exemplify the principles. Chemistry I and II form a year's sequential study of the principles of chemistry with applications describing elements and compounds and their reactions. This sequence meets the needs of students majoring in the physical and biological sciences. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH placement above 1010 or co-requisite MATH 1010.


Continuation of Chemistry I with emphasis on the energy changes associated with transformations of matter, kinetics of reactions, and the equilibrium considerations associated with reactions. General reactions of metals and non-metals and their compounds are also considered (includes an introduction to coordination compounds). Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.


Concepts in structure and bonding, periodic properties, molecular symmetry and its relationship to spectroscopy, coordination chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of selected elements. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


The chemistry of carbon compounds. Properties, synthesis, and reactions of saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydrocarbons, with emphasis on modern theoretical, mechanistic interpretations. Introduction to oxygen containing compounds. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


Continuation of organic Chemistry I, emphasizing carbonyl and nitrogen containing compounds. Determination of molecular structure via IR, UV, NMR, and mass spectral methods. Introduction to the structure and properties of natural products and biomolecules. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A study of equilibrium with special emphasis on acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and heterogeneous ionic equilibria. The laboratory is aimed primarily at developing quantitative laboratory skill. Three hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week.


A survey of the chemistry of the earth's environment, including atmospheric chemistry, pollution and the greenhouse effect, renewable energy, hazardous and nuclear waste, and water pollution. The ethical and moral responsibilities of humans to the environment are also discussed. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.


Kinetic theory of gases and the elements of thermodynamics applied to physical and chemical systems, including solutions and reactions. Fundamentals of reactions kinetics, including the study of catalysis, reaction mechanisms, and transition state theory applied to unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A study of the fundamentals of quantum mechanics applied to atoms and molecules. Applications to spectroscopy, including the study of lasers. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A study of the chemistry of biological compounds. Structure and properties of all classes of biomolecules. Interaction of biomolecules via catabolic generation of phosphate bond energy, and the utilization of this energy in biosynthesis. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


Includes structure and organization of human organ systems emphasizing skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and urogenital systems. Lab included with cadaver demonstrations. It is recommened that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Includes cell systems, cell cycles, cell function, energy production and metabolic systems, biological control systems, protein synthesis, and genetics. Lab included. It is recommended that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Selected aspects of bacteria, viral and eukaryotic parasite morphology, identification, physiology, and lifecycles, with a focus on how microbes affect human health, society and the environment. Includes an overview of the immune system's function, dysfunction, and modulation. Lab included.


Structure and function of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, muscular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the body. Lab included.


This course emphasizes the geography, life cycles, clinical presentations and impact of parasitic diseases on global health. Protozoans, nematodes, trematodes, cestodes and arthropods will be covered.


This course examines the efforts to understand biological origins and diversity. Patterns and principles of biodiversity and the significance of diversity will be considered. Emphasis will be placed on the principles and process of evolution rather than on the products of evolution. The class will include lecture, discussion, and workshop elements.


Study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory systems, stressing the effects of exercise on those systems. Lab included. Cross-listed with EXS 3160.


Study of living and non-living factors in biotic communities and their interaction in controlling the structure and development of various ecosystems. Principles of succession, population dynamics, and conservation. Supplemental overnight trips included. Lab included.


An introduction to Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance patterns as well as molecular genetics and biotechnology. Lab included.


A study of genes and gene regulation of living organisms at the molecular level. Particular attention will be given to modern biotechnology, genomics, and gene functions. Lab included.


Germ cell formation, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, and organogenesis in vertebrates. Extra-embryonic membranes and their functions. Study of the frog, the chick, and the pig. Lab included.


Topics included but not limited to neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and the neural networks of motor/sensory pathways, special senses, movement, language, emotion, and memory. Relevant diseases and conditions corresponding to the topics covered will also be discussed. Laboratory included during the lecture meeting times.


Course includes identification of a wide variety of pathogenic organisms, study of infectious diseases and treatments, and interpretation of laboratory tests used to identify etiological agents. Lab included.


A study of the immune system, stressing its role in protecting humans from the pathogenic microbes, by naturally and through medical intervention. Includes dysfunction associated with hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity. Clinically important immunological tests used in diagnostics will be presented. Lab included.


A comprehensive study of the lower extremities including the foot, ankle, knee, thigh, hip, pelvis, and spine. Injuries will be discussed from the following viewpoints: 1) prevention, 2) etiology and mechanism of injury, 3) pathology, 4) recognition and evaluation techniques, and 5) treatment.


A comprehensive study of the upper extremities including the shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, thumb, fingers, spine, thorax, abdomen, head, and face. This course also includes general medical conditions, skin infections, and common viruses. Injuries will be discussed from the following viewpoints: 1) prevention, 2) etiology and mechanism of injury, 3) pathology, 4) recognition and evaluation techniques, and 5) treatment.


Systematic analysis of human movement. The integrated study of applied anatomy and applied mechanics to the analysis of movement. Movement terminology as well as muscular system function in sport will be studied.


Study of human physiology with emphasis on the acute and chronic effects of exercise upon the muscular and cardiorespiratory systems. Lecture and lab required. Cross-listed with BIOL 3160.


This course provides an evidence-based overview of the theory and application of therapeutic interventions common to the rehabilitation of select musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the foundational theories such as physiology of injury, pain, stages of healing, altered movement as well as the exercises, modalities, and pharmacological interventions specific to the inflammatory and proliferation stages of healing.


This course provides an evidence-based overview of the theory and application of therapeutic interventions common to the rehabilitation of select musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Emphasis will be placed on exercises and modalities specific to the remodeling stage of healing and for the return to participation. Special considerations for the physical rehabilitation of various anatomical segments will also be explored.


This course is an introduction to a variety of practical, real-world tools used in physics to solve problems and complete projects. In contrast to other courses which focus on the theoretical and analytical aspects of physics, this course covers tools you can use to not only do homework problems but also to tackle real-world engineering and research projects. In this course the focus will be predominately on visual thinking tools. Such topics include drawing and sketching for visualization, imagery and ideation, and basic technical drawing. Coverage may also include basic design and engineering concepts as well as an introduction to CAD.


This course is an introduction to mathematical methods in physics. Topics covered include using spreadsheets (Excel), algebraic languages (Mathematical), and interpreted languages (Python) to solve basic physics problems. Elementary numerical methods and scientific visualization is also covered. Topics of coverage may include: approximation techniques, numerical differentiation and integration, matrices, complex variables, and solution of transcendental equations.


This course offers a practical introduction to DC and AC circuits, filters, diodes, power supplies, transistors, operational amplifiers, and logic gates. Emphasis will be placed on both the mathematical methods and the "rules of thumb" used in everyday laboratory settings.


This course is the lab to accompany PHEN 2510. Students will gain practical experience in building electronic circuits and using electrical measuring devices with an eye toward laboratory application. Co-requisite: PHEN 2510 (required).


This course presents a detailed account of the classical mechanics of particles, systems of particles, rigid bodies, moving coordinate systems, Lagrange and Hamiltonian formulations, linear oscillators, driven oscillators, nonlinear oscillations, and central force motion. A review of the mathematics of matrices, vectors, tensors, and vector calculus will be included. No lab is required.



An introduction to the important problems and topics in the area of business and professional ethics, e.g., job discrimination, corporate responsibility, environmental obligations, professional codes of ethics, power, and accountability.


An introduction to the meaning, ethics, and metaphysics of the human relation to various aspects of the world. Specific courses will focus on a single topic (e.g., nature, technology, culture, economics, religion.)


How do we know? How do we decide that a theory is true? What does it take to become convinced? Physics is perceived as a totally analytical and quantitative field. However, the reality is that even at the simplest level there is considerable judgment required in the interpretation of data and the assignment of meaning to theory. This course will include a brief overview of the history and philosophy of physics, discussion of the methods of doing physics, experimental techniques, and the role of approximation in theory and computation. The emphasis will be placed on the nature of knowledge and the extent to which it is socially constructed. Students will reflect on science ethics, science policy, the role of the scientist in society, and the interface between science and theology.


This course will cover a topic in the History and Philosophy of Physics. The credit hours will be determined by the choice of topics and the professor teaching the course. Readings in historical methods and philosophy of history will be included as well as instruction in the use of archival materials and oral histories. Proposed topics include: History of Quantum Mechanics and the Influence of the German Romantic Movement, Galileo and the Church, Cold War Science and the Rise of Big Science, Nuclear Security, and Medieval Engineering.


Study of ordinary differential equations, especially first and second order, with applications to geometry and the physical life sciences. Uses computers.


A detailed study of functions of several variables including differentiation, line and surface integrals, and Green and Stokes' theorems. Uses computers.


A study of matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, orthogonality, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Uses computers. Lab included.