Joseph Alulis

Professor of Politics and Government

“There are invariably international students in class, they are encouraged to offer their perspectives,” says Dr. Alulis.

In addition to internships in the city and other courses like Chicago Politics, Professor Alulis says, “I encourage students in the International Politics course to attend lectures sponsored by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and students are informed of relevant museum exhibitions.”

The personal connection between politics and government and between professors and students is important to Professor Alulis. “The faculty are actively engaged in their own research, with opportunities for students to participate. Classes are rigorous and students get a lot of personal attention,” he says.

Recent Publications

Joseph Alulis. “’The Very Heart of Loss’: Love and Politics in Antony and Cleopatra.” In Shakespeare and the Body Politic. Edited by Bernard J. Dobski and Dustin Gish. Lexington, 2013 (forthcoming).

Joseph Alulis. “The Tragedy of Politics: Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra.” Perspectives on Political Science, vol 41 #4 (Fall 2012):190-194.

Joseph Alulis. “Dostoevsky and the Metaphysical Foundation of the Liberal Regime.” Perspectives on Political Science, vol 38, #4 (Fall 2009): 206-16.

Events/Lectures

Contributor to the City Desk of Shakespeare 400 Chicago program.

Currently working on Shakespeare's English history plays for their lessons about politics; The Federalist.

Popular Courses

Political Philosophy, because the course is a provocative reflection by the greatest minds on vital questions.

International Political Economy, because the course illustrates complicated relation between science, policy, and politics and deals with contemporary issues of great importance.

Inspirations & Interests

President Abraham Lincoln

Novel: The Brothers Karamazov

Film: Lawrence of Arabia, The Grand Illusion

Poet: Shakespeare

Historical Period: fifth century BCE Athens, Florence in the Renaissance, United States at the founding, 1786-89

Philosophers: Plato and Aristotle