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Johnny Lin

Johnny Lin, Physics professor
Professor of Physics

Expertise: Tropical and arctic climate dynamics

At North Park since: 2005

Johnny Lin was drawn to North Park for its unique integration of faith and academia. “It is a goal in all my classes that the students will learn something more about worshiping God in the study of the content of the course,” he says.

Johnny’s expertise as an atmospheric scientist allows students to examine the city of Chicago and the world around them through the lens of creation care. “In my Climate Dynamics course,” he says, “we have a lab where students wade in the North Branch of the Chicago River to measure its profile and speed, and the elevation of the water surface.”

These kinds of hands-on experiences prepare students for a wide array of potential careers, Johnny says. “Our view about physics and engineering at North Park is that they prepares you to do anything,” he says. “Physics and engineering students learn how to analyze systems, solve problems, use and understand data, make a computer do what you want it to, and, most of all, how to learn.”

Where you apply those skills, and how you build off that foundation, Johnny says, is up to you. But he will be there to help guide you. “When you’re part of the physics and engineering department, you’re part of a family. We will walk alongside you as you meet the challenge of physics. You won’t be alone in the adventure.”

Education

  • PhD, Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles
  • MS, Civil Engineering–Water Resources, Stanford University
  • BS, Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University

Recent Publications

  • Johnny Lin. "The Role of Science in Defining the Content of Creation Care." The Covenant Quarterly, vol 67 (2009): 20–34, 37–38.
  • Johnny Lin. "qtcm 0.1.2: A Python Implementation of the Neelin-Zeng Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model." Geoscientific Model Development vol 2 (2009): 1–11.
  • Johnny Lin, J. D. Neelin. "Considerations for Stochastic Convective Parameterization." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences vol 59 (2002): 959–975.
“When you’re part of the physics department, you’re part of a family. We will walk alongside you as you meet the challenge of physics. You won’t be alone in the adventure.”