Undergraduate Programs

Program Requirements

Students who complete the bachelor of science (BS) degree in athletic training will be prepared to take and pass the Board of Certification exam at the end of their program to become athletic trainers (ATC). North Park’s Athletic Training Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

Important Note: North Park University is transitioning its CAATE-accredited undergraduate athletic training degree to an entry-level master’s degree. This is in response to the requirement that soon athletic trainers must possess a master’s degree to enter the workforce. After the 2017-2018 academic year, we will no longer be accepting students into our undergraduate athletic training program. Instead, students who come to campus during 2018-2019 and beyond will be eligible to complete our 3+2 accelerated master’s degree where the student can receive both a bachelor’s degree in exercise science and a master of science degree in athletic training in 5 calendar years pending final approval of HLC and the CAATE.

Prerequisites and Application Process

Students who intend to major in athletic training at North Park must follow the application process and meet admission requirements to the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Entrance into North Park does not guarantee entrance into the ATP. This selective program maintains a small student-to-faculty ratio, which promotes quality education and ensures exceptional opportunities for hands-on learning.

16 students are accepted into the program each year. You should take Introduction to Athletic Training (EXS 1610) during your first semester at North Park, where you’ll receive an ATP application packet (see specific requirements below for more details).

Transfer students should contact Andrew Lundgren, program director, directly for transfer information. Transfer students are accepted into ATP based on space availability; priority is given to students who begin at North Park and participate in the standard ATP admissions process. If space remains, preference is given to students who have met similar admissions requirements at comparable schools. All ATP students may have to successfully complete all credits for the major at North Park.

You’ll apply to ATP during the spring semester of your first year, and will know in early April if you’ve been admitted to the program. This will help you enroll for the correct courses to being the ATP curriculum in the fall of your second year. Athletic training students are expected to earn a minimum overall GPA of 2.50 as well as complete observation hours in the North Park athletic training facility before beginning the ATP curriculum.

Acceptance to North Park University and/or completion of the application requirements does not guarantee acceptance into the Athletic Training Program. Students must apply separately to this program. An application packet detailing the application process and materials will be provided to the student while enrolled in EXS 1610: Introduction to Athletic Training. The application must include:

  • A completed application form
  • Verification by an appropriate health care provider that the student is in good health and has had necessary immunizations.
  • Verification that student can meet technical standards.
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • A passing score on the ATP entrance examination
  • The completion of 50 observation hours in the NPU athletic training facility
  • A completed clinical proficiencies list
  • Successful completion of EXS 1610 with a grade of 2.67 (B-) or better
  • Successful completion of the following courses taken at NPU with a GPA of 2.5 or better:
    • EXS 1000: Personal Health
    • EXS 1600: First Aid and CPR
    • EXS 1610: Introduction to Athletic Training
    • BIOL 1250: Introduction to Human Anatomy
  • A transcript from NPU showing an overall GPA of 2.5 or better
  • Completion of a formal interview with the selection committee.

Major Requirements

Required semester hours:
62 credits of major coursework
46 core curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

The Athletic Training Program Student Handbook has information on program mission, objectives, goals, curriculum, fees, admission requirements, vaccination records, clinical guidelines, and grievance policy.  The Technical Standards form needs to be completed prior to program admittance.  Prospective students are encouraged to meet with the faculty for more information on the athletic training program.

Student Handbook   Technical Standards Form

Background Check – $45 (one time fee)
Castle Branch – $35 (one time fee)
NATA Membership (necessary for clinical education documentation) – $75 (annual)
Transportation for clinical education – variable
Health Insurance – variable
Vaccinations (annual TB) – variable (approximately $30-$50)
Clothing – variable (approximately $100)

The Academic Planning Guide provides a helpful overview of course requirements to assist in planning course selections.

Academic Planning Guide

The Core Curriculum at North Park provides students with a foundation of liberal arts studies in complement to their individual major. Learn more about Core Curriculum courses and requirements.

Core Curriculum

The descriptions below provide examples of the curriculum you will study as an athletic training major. For complete course offerings and descriptions, review the academic catalog.

Academic Catalog

Includes structure and organization of human organ systems emphasizing skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and urogenital systems. Lab included with cadaver demonstrations. It is recommened that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


A study of physical and psychological well-being, including exercise and nutrition.


Study of immediate care of the injured or ill. Based on American Red Cross standards. Certification in First Aid, CPR, and AED available.


Introduction to the care and rehabilitation of athletic injuries with emphasis on current methods of athletic training.


Structure and function of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, muscular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the body. Lab included.


A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 clock hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the first semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork, and practical experience in the North Park University athletic training facility. All will be under the direct supervision of an Athletic Trainer (AT). Emphasis is athletic training facility operations and procedures.


A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 clock hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the second semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork, and practical experience in the North Park University athletic training facility. All will be under the direct supervision of an Athletic Trainer (AT). Emphasis will be on lower extremity injury evaluation and lower body taping/splinting.


A comprehensive study of the lower extremities including the foot, ankle, knee, thigh, hip, pelvis, and spine. Injuries will be discussed from the following viewpoints: 1) prevention, 2) etiology and mechanism of injury, 3) pathology, 4) recognition and evaluation techniques, and 5) treatment.


A study of preventative measures and acute care techniques used in athletic training. Concepts, applications, and procedures used in managing external hemorrhage, taping, equipment fitting, splinting and transporting will be emphasized. This course also includes an environmental conditions and incorporating evidence into clinical decision making.

A comprehensive study of the upper extremities including the shoulder, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, thumb, fingers, spine, thorax, abdomen, head, and face. This course also includes general medical conditions, skin infections, and common viruses. Injuries will be discussed from the following viewpoints: 1) prevention, 2) etiology and mechanism of injury, 3) pathology, 4) recognition and evaluation techniques, and 5) treatment.


Develop an understanding of the principles of motivation, the importance of leadership and communication skills, and the different psychological skills athletes can use to improve performance.


Systematic analysis of human movement. The integrated study of applied anatomy and applied mechanics to the analysis of movement. Movement terminology as well as muscular system function in sport will be studied.


This course is designed to introduce allied health students to concepts related to evidence-based practice. Specifically, students will develop the skills necessary to identify relevant research and critically appraise the literature as to its quality and applicability to clinical practice. Students will gain an understanding of the research process as well as recognize the importance of assessing clinical outcomes.


A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 clock hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the third semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork, and practical experience in a North Park University athletic training facility or affiliated sports medicine clinic. All will be under the direct supervision of an Athletic Trainer (AT). Emphasis is on upper extremity injury evaluation, upper extremity taping/splinting and general medical conditions.


A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the fourth semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork, and practical experience in a North Park University athletic training facility or an affiliated sports medicine clinic. All will be under the direct supervision of a Athletic Trainer (AT) and/or Physical Therapist (PT). Emphasis is on developing comprehensive rehabilitation plans that include psychosocial interventions, cultural competence and nutritional considerations.

Study of human physiology with emphasis on the acute and chronic effects of exercise upon the muscular and cardiorespiratory systems. Lecture and lab required. Cross-listed with BIOL 3160.


This course will introduce students to an evidence-based review of the direct effects of diet on health and physical activity. Specific topics addressed include nutrient metabolism, body composition management, hydration, health effects, supplement and food ethics.


This course provides an evidence-based overview of the theory and application of therapeutic interventions common to the rehabilitation of select musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the foundational theories such as physiology of injury, pain, stages of healing, altered movement as well as the exercises, modalities, and pharmacological interventions specific to the inflammatory and proliferation stages of healing.

This course provides an evidence-based overview of the theory and application of therapeutic interventions common to the rehabilitation of select musculoskeletal injuries and conditions. Emphasis will be placed on exercises and modalities specific to the remodeling stage of healing and for the return to participation. Special considerations for the physical rehabilitation of various anatomical segments will also be explored.


A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the fifth semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork and practical experience in an affiliate college/university athletic training facility, high school athletic training facility or other AT practice setting. All will be under the direct supervision of an Athletic Trainer (AT) or other licensed healthcare provider. Emphasis will be on comprehensive rehabilitation plans, acute and emergency care techniques, evaluation of injury/illness risk factors, prevention programs, and evidence-based clinical practice.

A course designed to formally structure a minimum of 150 hours of clinical experience (time by arrangement) specific to the sixth semester of enrollment in the Athletic Training Program (ATP). Includes observation, fieldwork and practical experience in an affiliate college/university athletic training facility, high school athletic training facility or other AT practice setting. All will be under the direct supervision of a Athletic Trainer (AT) or other licensed healthcare professional. Emphasis will be on pharmacology and trasition to practice including scope of practice, professional development, referral and legal issues.


Designed to give an understanding of the planning, coordinating, and supervision of all administrative components of an athletic training program in a clinical, high school, college, professional, or industrial setting. Emphasis will be placed on facility organization and design, budgeting, legal liability, day-to-day scheduling, personnel management, record keeping and ethical considerations.


This is the last course in the athletic training program. The focus is on pharmacology, general medical conditions, preparing for the BOC examination, and professional development.

Students participating in intercollegiate athletics at North Park are welcome to apply to the program. The ATP has a significant clinical component which often requires commitment during afternoons, evenings, and on weekends. It is possible that time conflicts between sport demands and clinical requirements will occur. Although every effort is made to minimize these conflicts, it is possible that you may have to complete a clinical rotational during your traditional athletic season.

If admitted to ATP as a student athlete, you will only be able to participate on one intercollegiate team per academic year, and only during your team’s traditional season. You will only be allowed to participate in the non-traditional season if it doesn’t interfere with course requirements.