Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Program Requirements

Complete a master of organizational leadership (MOL) degree for a broad, multi-disciplinary preparation for your career as a leader and manager in the business, nonprofit, or government sectors.

The MOL is a 36-semester-hour degree, requiring 13 core courses and five electives. Each graduate course is two semester hours. You can complete the degree in just 21 months, but, on average, our students complete the program in two-and-a-half years.

Electives

Elective courses for all graduate business and nonprofit degrees can be chosen from the wide range of choices available in the School of Business and Nonprofit Management. The core courses listed below cannot count as electives. You may be able to complete a graduate business or nonprofit certificate through your elective credits.

View all graduate business and nonprofit courses.

Master of Organizational Leadership Core Courses

 

Students may begin the MOL degree program in August 2015. Some of the courses in this degree program are new for the fall semester, and their course descriptions are not yet available. Please review the full academic catalog for the year you enroll at North Park for official requirements, including prerequisite and corequisite courses. The catalog, our course schedules, and a School of Business and Nonprofit Management advisor, can assist you in planning your course sequence to complete your MOL degree.

This course develops an understanding of human behavior in changing organizations and the managerial awareness, tools and methods that increase effectiveness. The course explores principles and theories about individuals and groups at work, motivation and interactive drives and processes for satisfying needs, organization strategies for effectively utilizing people and creating the environment to achieve goals of people and companies. The course also examines ethical issues and the rational integration of ethical thinking and decision-making in competitive organizations. New models of teams, organization structure and organizational development practices are studied as the product of today's transforming organizations.

This course examines the importance of ethical leadership and decision-making to the success of high performance organizations. Ethical issues are examined from a variety of perspectives, analyzed utilizing multiple ethical issue typologies, and possible outcomes determined through the application of a number of decision-making formats. Frameworks for ethics and leadership are assessed and interpreted in light of the leadership behaviors in a number of ethically challenging situations. Finally, students will assess their own ethical leadership views and generate leadership development plans.

This course examines current theory and practice as it applies to the management of human resources within organizations. Specific focus is given on the effects of organizational mission and culture on human resource management. The processes of recruitment and selection, training and development, performance evaluation, compensation and motivation, and legal influences are examined. The course takes the viewpoint of human resource management as a key responsibility of every manager within the organization.

The modern organization is diverse visibly with respect to diversity gender, race, age, and cultural background and invisibly with respect to multiple aspects of diversity including personality, values, communication styles and management styles. This course addresses the significance of both visible and invisible diversity and the need to understand and manage it. This course also provides a broad survey of approaches to analyzing and managing conflict. A variety of topics will be covered, including identifying the origins of organizational conflict, how to diagnose and positively utilize conflict, understanding the dynamics of conflict, and the appropriate role of effective leadership styles in resolving conflict.

This course provides a conceptual framework in which to explore competitive and cooperative aspects of business situations and emphasizes the crucial role played by negotiations in accomplishing organizational objectives while enhancing relationships with key stakeholders. The development and use of power to influence others is covered as well as specific negotiating tactics. Students are afforded opportunities for actual negotiating experiences that will help them become better negotiators, attain improved resolutions for disputes, and reach more mutually beneficial agreements.

This course presents valuable tools and methods that assist with recruitment and retention of the most qualified people that are also a good fit with the organization. Exercises provide experience in selecting the right employees and in coaching and counseling for current and future performance improvement that emphasizes the capacity to provide feedback in a way that it will actually be heard. Finally the ethics of termination will be discussed together with looking when and under what circumstances termination should occur. Additionally, this course will assist with the construction of individualized career plans for each student.

This course is based on the premise that today's world increasingly depends upon collaboration for success. Teams are currently touted as the primary organizational unit in which the collaborative effort takes place. Students will investigate the arguments for and against teams and teamwork. Through exposure to theoretical knowledge and experiential learning technologies, the students will identify when teams are, and are not appropriate, as well as examine what is required to create a truly effective, high performing team.

Given the ever-increasing, complex interdependency between international economies, this course is intended to give business and nonprofit organizational leaders an understanding of how to better manage operations in the context of supply, demand, competition, economic and trade policies in a global marketplace. The course will focus on macroeconomic topics such as gross domestic product, income and employment and combine them with absolute and comparative advantage theories that drive the continuous need for international trade. Global economic topics, such as the IS-LM model, cultural comparisons and foreign trade policy will help form the fluidity of both domestic and international business interactions from both diverse and Christian ethical perspectives.

Focusing on the interplay among the corporate, government, and nonprofit sectors, this course will address the issues and current trends in corporate social responsibility and sustainability. The triple bottom line of social, environmental, and economic results will be explored. Topics covered include: sustainability, public private partnerships, corporations' role in climate change, supply chain responsibility, stakeholder engagement, cause and social marketing, environmental responsibility, socially responsible investing, sustainability reporting, transparency, and human rights.

A foundation course examining the origins and societal role of private nonprofit organizations including their social, political, economic, cultural, and ideological importance in American society and compared against the global non-governmental sector and organizations. Major types of nonprofit organizations are studied, as well as distinguishing organizational characteristics of third-sector institutions as contrasted with business and government organizations. Current trends in the nonprofit sector and projections for the future are analyzed.

This course examines the assessment of effectiveness against service delivery objectives. The course uses the logic model and other theoretical models to better understand the outcomes and assessment process. Case studies will highlight evaluation issues for improved organizational performance. Prerequisite: Any SBNM course. This may not be the first course in the SBNM academic program.

This course addresses the application of leadership skills to transform organizations. The external and internal drivers of organizational change are explored and systems archetypes are utilized to analyze the root causes of organizational issues that must be dealt with in order for change initiatives to be successful.

This course serves as the capstone course for the Master of Organizational Leadership and will emphasize the application of leadership knowledge, gained throughout the degree coursework, to the strategic planning process. Additionally, the course is designed to introduce a wide variety of modern strategy frameworks and methodologies, including, mission formulation, values articulation, vision building, stakeholder mapping, competitive environment scanning, SWOT analysis, strategy formulation, strategy implementation and strategy evaluation. Finally, the students will practice the use of group facilitation skills in the application of course concepts. The outcome of this class is a foundation for the application of consensus driven strategies and analytics tools needed to develop and improve a firm's competitive advantage while enhancing organizational communication and building a collaborative culture.