Economics Program Requirements featured image background

Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Students completing the requirements for a bachelor of science (BS) degree in business and economics with a concentration in economics will be prepared to enter the business and nonprofit world as ethical leaders and competent analysts, with superior critical thinking and communication skills for professional settings.

Major Requirements

56 hours of major coursework
300-hour internship
46 general education credits
120 total credits for graduation

ACADEMIC CATALOG

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

An introduction to the theory and practice of public speaking. Topics include types of speeches, types and uses of source material, organization, performance, and speech criticism.


Beginning calculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, mean value theorem, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives, Riemann Sums, introduction to the definite integrals. Uses computers. Lab included. Student should have completed four years of high school math.


An introduction to the important problems and topics in the area of business and professional ethics, e.g., job discrimination, corporate responsibility, environmental obligations, professional codes of ethics, power, and accountability.


Introduction to applied statistical analysis. Descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics; concepts of population, sample, sampling distribution; elements of probability; parameters of discrete distributions; hypothesis testing: analysis of proportions, means, and variance; linear regression. Computer applications required. Cross-listed with MATH 1490.


A study of generally accepted accounting principles and techniques for measurement and reporting of financial information in a balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. It includes an introduction to analysis and interpretation of financial data for decision-making purposes.


A study of managerial accounting concepts relevant to decision-making. Topics include cost accounting systems, the nature of costs, standard costs, and budgeting.


An introduction to basic economic concepts and models. An aggregate and analytical view of economic analysis focusing on national income, employment, the price level, and economic growth. The theory of income determination, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and the international economy. Current issues and policies in macroeconomics including studies on labor force and job structure. Historical review and development of economic doctrines. Co-requisite: BSE 2110.


Development of the fundamental analytical tools of microeconomics analysis. Presentation of the concepts of the market, consumer behavior, and the behavior of the firm. The theory of production and cost, market structures, and distribution theory. Current issues and policies related to exchange and resource allocation, decisions on choice, and income distribution in markets. Historical perspectives on income distribution and industry structure.


An introduction to finance. The study includes a discussion of basic concepts, including accounting statements, security markets, interest rates, taxes, risk analysis, time value of money, and the basics of security valuation. It includes how financial managers can help maximize their firm's values by improving decisions in such areas as capital budgeting, choice of capital structure, and working capital management.


Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software such as SAP and Oracle will be introduced through the study of Operations Management. Operations Management today relies on ERP systems for all planning and customer service in most large organizations. The topics of forecasting, materials management, production planning and execution, logistics scheduling and execution, and order management and fulfillment will be studied in the context of ERP systems. Other topics will include make-buy decision making as well as introductions to quality management and linear programming.

This course uses the scientific method to find and solve problems in the operations of a for-profit or nonprofit organization. Mathematical models are used to measure and analyze problems dealing with efficiency. Topics include: statistics, forecasting, linear programming, project management, and quality. This quantitative course helps the student to become an agent for change within our society's global or local organizations.


The legal process surrounding civil dispute resolution, including intentional torts, negligence, and ethical standards. Introduction to contracts, mutual assent, contractual capacity, and Uniform Commercial Code. Will also focus on the relationship of principal and agent; duties, rights, and liabilities of partnerships; the nature, formation, and powers of corporations.


This course emphasizes the importance of communicating effectively and ethically in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on multiple modes of communication; written, oral, and, non-verbal. Students will provide resumes developed through the Career Development and Internship Office programming to assess readiness for personal interviewing. Strategies for professional presentation methods such as Prezi or PowerPoint will be explored. Business writing will also include an executive summary of a persuasive speech, sales pitch, or fundraising request using qualitative and quantitative data.


An introduction to the marketing function in private and public organizations, designed to provide students with an overview of marketing concepts, tools, and methods of analysis. The course takes a practical, managerial approach to managing the marketing process. Steps in the marketing process, including market research, segmentation, targeting, positioning, and the four P's (product, place, price, promotion) are explored, along with concepts of customer value and satisfaction, competitive analysis, brand strategy, consumer behavior, advertising, and the impact of the internet on marketing strategy and implementation. Concurrent enrollment in BSE 2211 is an option.


Intermediate microeconomics focusing on resource allocation and price determination in markets. Analyzes consumers and business firms as decision-making units. Emphasis on mathematical methods including calculus and optimization techniques. Applications of contemporary economic analysis related to business decisions.


The analysis of the aggregate economy. Presentation of national income accounting and the theory of income determination. Macroeconomics model building using IS and LM, theories of investment, growth, and the international economy. Economic fluctuations, monetary theory and policy, and fiscal policy. Mathematical applications and analysis of current data. Application and analysis for business decision-making.


Presents the development of economic analysis. Relates economic conditions and the role of economic thought in historical context. Evaluates schools of economic thought, Mercantilism, Physiocracy, Classicism, and Keynesianism. Primary sources are used to present significant writers, such as Adam Smith, David Ricardo, J.S. Mill, and J.M. Keynes. Current writers and topics of debate including unemployment, labor markets, inflation, income, and economic growth are analyzed. A service learning project is included which provides the basis for application of economic concepts to solving contemporary problems. This project also provides the opportunity for research and data collection.


This course addresses the principles of management and leadership along with their historical underpinnings. The scope of the course includes managerial (i.e. planning, organizing, leading, and controlling) and leader (i.e. process, influence, context, attainment, shared experience) function and responsibility; effective and ethical manager and leader characteristics. Particular attention is paid to issues of gender and cultural diversity. Application of the above theory is practiced throughout the course in the form of project based teams, self-management activities, assessments, authentic leadership development, presentations, and introductory level scholarly research using APA (American Psychological Association) style for research writing.


This is the capstone course of the undergraduate business curriculum. As such it will synthesize the various disciplines of management and address the overall determination of strategic direction for the business organization. The student will begin by investigating the basics of human behavior in organizations and apply this theory to the organizational decision making process. Emphasis will be on the five steps of strategic management: mission determination, environmental analysis, organizational analysis, strategy selection, and organizational implementation. Students will have an opportunity to participate in a computer simulation of a business organization, which requires them to synthesize the various disciplines they have studied throughout their undergraduate curriculum.


The introductory course will give students an overview of America's nonprofit sector as it relates to both the for-profit business and government sectors. Emphasis will be on the history, purpose, and theories of the sector; the legal and regulatory environment; efforts to improve ethics and accountability; the sector's economics and funding environment; trends in evaluation and outcome measurement; and general management problems and principles. The course will also discuss opportunities for personal growth and career advancement available in the sector and highlight skills and training needed to succeed.


This course studies the basis for international trade, and how global exchanges of resources take place. The course studies the changing patterns of trade between nations in various regions of the world. The competition of nations in global markets and the strategic positions of business firms within international markets are analyzed. The course studies both developed nations as well as the newly industrializing countries representing emerging markets. The nature and goals of regional economic alliances are presented, and the role played by national governments in shaping global trade is discussed. The course explains differences in technology exchanges between nations.


This course combines mathematical methods with economic and business models in order to develop and provide empirical content for these models. This approach is appropriately applied in the solution of practical problems. In addition, these methods allow for a more precise analysis of relevant economic and business issues. Accurate and measurable analysis is the basis of the formulation of appropriate policy. Such policy may take the form of setting macroeconomic or microeconomic goals, or in the development and application of strategic objectives of business firms. Econometric methods and applications provide a significant basis for making more reliable economic and business decisions.


This course develops methods for the analysis of the organizational, technological, industrial, and informational structure of the business firm's competitive environment. In the process of introducing and developing applied business research methods and case studies, the competitive and strategic decisions made by firms will be assessed and evaluated. Managers must have a relevant and reliable understanding of competitive and industrial conditions, and the ability to analyze information and manage in a variety of new and changing situations. Ethical considerations and social responsibility are consistently included and explored in the process of discussing business decision making.