Undergraduate Programs

Program Requirements

Students who complete the major requirements for a bachelor of arts (BA) in philosophy will be prepared to serve the common good as public intellectuals, in whatever field and career they choose, through careful and critical thought and conversation, reflection, reading, writing, and experience. Students can choose from a traditional philosophy BA or an interdisciplinary BA that pairs philosophy with upper-level coursework in another discipline.

Major Requirements

36 hours of major coursework
12 humanities credits co-requirements
46 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Minor Requirements:

20 semester hours

ACADEMIC CATALOG

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

A survey of the thinkers and movements in the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the late medieval and early Renaissance period.


A survey of the thinkers and movements in the history of philosophy from the 16th through the 21st century.


An intermediate course in formal and informal logic.


An introduction to the important problems and topics in the area of business and professional ethics, e.g., job discrimination, corporate responsibility, environmental obligations, professional codes of ethics, power, and accountability.


An introduction to the meaning, ethics, and metaphysics of the human relation to various aspects of the world. Specific courses will focus on a single topic (e.g., nature, technology, culture, economics, religion.)


A seminar course on selected problems and topics in the area of social and political ethics, e.g., the nature of political associations, the variety of competing visions of the good and just society. Cross-listed with POGO 3100.


An experiential education approach to philosophy.


A seminar course on selected problems and topics in the area of aesthetics, e.g., the nature and meaning of aesthetic value, the problem of aesthetic judgment.


A seminar course on selected problems and topics in the area of hermeneutics, e.g., the nature of understanding; of language and meaning; and the role of context, tradition, and pre-judgment.


A seminar course on selected topics and problems in philosophy.


A course which permits students to explore vocational options that pertain to philosophy. Please refer to the internship section of the catalog for requirements and guidelines.