Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Students completing the requirements for a bachelor of music education (BME) degree will be prepared to teach music—either instrumental, vocal, or piano—to grades kindergarten through twelve in public and private schools.

Major Requirements

59 hours of major coursework
35 hours of education coursework
40 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Minor Requirements:

20 semester hours

ACADEMIC CATALOG

CORE CURRICULUM

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

This course is designed to offer students opportunities to listen to a variety of concerts and recitals, and to perform as soloists as well. In addition, guest artists conduct master classes on occasion during the Thursday afternoon sessions. Students registered for this course have a set number of requirements to attend General and Class Recitals that occur on Thursday afternoons, evening and weekend concerts, and recitals from the School of Music Concert Calendar. Students also have specific performance requirements associated with the General and Class Recitals.


A select group of wind, rhythm, and percussion players determined by audition. Repertoire includes music for large jazz groups from the big band era to the present. An on-campus concert is presented each term, along with occasional outside performances.


Open to all wind and percussion players, this group is dedicated to the performance of wind ensemble music, both original music and transcriptions. Performances include on-campus concerts each term.


Devoted to the study and preparation of orchestral literature from the Baroque era to the present through regular rehearsal and performance. All instrumentalists are welcome. Principal positions and general seating are determined by audition. Orchestra Rehearsals and Concerts are centered around Education in Human Values (based on five universal core values - truth, love, peace, right conduct and non-violence) and serve as a model for the Certificate in Music for Social Change and Human Values.


A select group of experienced choristers, determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with regular national and foreign tours. The University Choir performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music. Cross-listed with MUS 5800.


A select group of female singers determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with national and foreign tours periodically. The Women's Chorale performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music.


For students with a minimum of 3-5 years of piano study. A highly focused and practical approach to the performance of music materials commonly used in music education and worship programs. Areas of study include: advanced score reading using C clefs; transpositions, and keyboard improvisation. For music majors as required by degree track.


An introduction to basic skills and concepts that are foundational to further studies in music. Topics in music theory, aural skills, and keyboard harmony will be taught against the contextual background of a broad overview of stylistic periods in music history.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in diatonic music of graded difficulty.


Continuation of sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in a diatonic music of graded difficulty.


A study of American popular music from the birth of rock-and-roll in the 1950s to the present. The basic elements of music will also be covered. Individual works are analyzed and placed within their cultural and historical frameworks. Listening and analysis.


Introduction to the fundamentals of applied techniques specific to various instruments in the brass family.


Introduction to the fundamentals of applied techniques specific to various instruments in the woodwind family.


Introduction to the fundamentals of applied techniques specific to various instruments in the percussion family.


Introduction to the fundamentals of applied techniques specific to various instruments in the string family.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to more advanced music including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, intervals, an introduction of chromaticism in scale patterns, melodies, and harmony.


Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to advanced music including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, intervals in an atonal context, more advanced chromaticism in scale patterns, melodies, harmony, and formal analysis.


Study of basic elements of diatonic music. Topics include triadic harmony, non-chord tones, melodic organization, phrase structure, cadences.


Continuing study of the principles of diatonic music. Topics include elements of melodic structure; pitch and rhythm, embellishing tones, melodic form and composition, and part writing with triads and seventh chords.


An introduction to current software programs and their applications for music education, composition, and production. Music graphics, sequencing and pedagogical software and hardware will be used in this course.


An overview of the sounds of Latin and English and basic rules for pronunciation using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Previous language study is desirable but not necessary. A supplement to traditional language study focusing on authoritative pronunciation for the unique needs of singers and choral conductors. Includes lecture, written tests, and assignments. This course is a prerequisite for all other diction courses. Cross-listed as MUS 5421.


An overview of the sounds of Spanish and basic rules for pronunciation using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Previous language study is desirable but not necessary. A supplement to traditional language study focusing on authoritative pronunciation for the unique needs of singers and choral conductors. Includes lecture, written tests, and assignments. Cross-listed as MUS 5422.


All students must register for this course in the semester of their Sophomore Conference.


This survey of the history of western music from the Baroque period through the mid-Romantic period is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.


A historical study of music, compositional techniques, and aesthetic concepts beginning with Ancient Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages proceeding through the late Renaissance. Listening and analysis.


This survey of the history of western music from the late Romantic period through the present time is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.


A survey of the history of jazz. The material will be approached through selected readings, recorded listening examples, classroom discussion, and special projects.


Intermediate applied techniques and pedagogical methods for teaching beginning and intermediate players.


Intermediate applied techniques and pedagogical methods for teaching beginning and intermediate players.


Intermediate applied techniques and pedagogical methods for teaching beginning and intermediate players.


Intermediate applied techniques and pedagogical methods for teaching beginning and intermediate players.


Study of principles of chromaticism in tonal music, including secondary functions, modulation, mode mixture, altered pre-dominants, and other advanced chromatic harmony. Formal analysis, introduction to counterpoint, study of inventions, and fugue. Short composition projects and analysis of 19th century works.


Study of compositional techniques in late 19th and 20th century music. Topics include linear chromaticism, use of synthetic scales and modes, post-tonal techniques in both centric, freely atonal and serial contexts. Introduction to pitch-class set theory. Analysis of major works in each of these areas.


Beginning and intermediate conducting skills: beat patterns, baton technique, use of face, eyes, left hand; basic rehearsal planning; score preparation; psychology of conducting. An introduction to choral and instrumental methods and materials.


An advanced study of the conducting concepts covered in MUS 3170. A more in-depth exploration of choral and instrumental methods and materials for the purpose of developing skills in applied musicianship.


An exploration of the current pedagogical practices with regard to elementary music education. Through the study of various musical philosophies and methodologies, along with the National Standards for Music Education, students will develop and practice appropriate lesson plans and assessment tools for teaching all types of learners the basic elements common to most music curricula. A survey of the most widely used pedagogical systems in music education (Orff, Kodaly, and Dalcroze) will be featured. Other topics include: theories of music learning, testing and measurement, assessment, multicultural resources and their applications, technology in the music classroom, arts integration strategies, and building a defense for arts in education.


Physiology of the voice and pedagogical methods for teaching singing. Mentored clinical teaching with in-class observation and critique. Tests cover text and lectures. Cross-listed with MUS 5401.


A continuation of MUS 3401: Physiology of the voice and pedagogical methods for teaching singing. Mentored clinical teaching with in-class observation and critique. Tests cover text and lectures. Research paper on a voice related topic, either in the area of voice science or pedagogy. More emphasis on clinical teaching. Cross-listed with MUS 5402.


Philosophies, techniques, methodologies, and administration of secondary school music programs for general music and vocal programs including curriculum, unit/lesson/rehearsal planning, vocal techniques, performance practice, conducting, skill building, and technology integration. Students will examine common challenges associated with secondary choral programs including advocacy, diverse learning populations, and various choral ensembles such as show choir. Relevant materials, resources, and repertoire will be examined to enable students to effectively teach from perspectives that are intentionally multicultural and interdisciplinary, and stylistically diverse.


Philosophies, techniques, methodologies, and administration of secondary school music programs for instrumental music programs including an overview of relevant repertoire, computer technologies, multicultural resources for concert band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, marching band, chamber ensembles, and class guitar.


Periodic intense investigations of selected topics such as: The Entrepreneurial Musician, Single Composer Survey, Film Music, Performer's Health, Advanced Music Theory, Jazz Improvisational Techniques and others.


A study of the ranges, techniques, timbres, and scoring of traditional orchestral instruments. Arranging for small instrumental ensembles is emphasized.


This course is an introduction to the teaching profession. Topics covered include historical, philosophical, contemporary, and ethical perspectives on education as well as social and cultural expectations in teaching. In this introductory course, students are informed on the appropriate role of technology; state and national standards; policies governing education at the national, state, and local level; and careers and organizations related to teaching and education. This course also introduces students to state licensure requirements.


Study of the psychological aspects of human behavior and development applied to teaching and learning processes, including learning theories, motivation, and classroom management.


Basic principles of curriculum including, planning, organizing and developing lesson plans in relation to the individual learner, the school, and the society are discussed. Historical developments and recent innovations in school curriculum, lesson planning and preparation, and instructional delivery will be analyzed. Emphasis is on planning and preparation of lesson plans according to the School of Education lesson plan template aligned with the Danielson Domains, edTPA, Illinois Learning Standards and Common Core Standards. Needs of multi-cultural and special needs students are addressed. Electronic professional portfolios will be developed.


This course introduces students to research-based instructional strategies along with basic principles and practices of classroom assessment. Special attention will be given to differentiated instruction, maximizing student engagement and learning, formative and summative assessment practices, and the use of data in classroom decision-making.


A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the young adolescent. Examination of developmental issues that impact the middle school, its philosophy, and its practices which are responsive to the adolescent, both cognitively and affectively.


This course examines diversity in the classroom with attention to the linguistic, cultural, academic and cognitive dimensions of student development and learning. This course will also examine the instructional planning, instructional strategies and culturally responsive practices for diverse learners. Consideration will be given to the ways racial-ethnic segregation, ESL, bilingual, bicultural, and special education programs have impacted schools and their communities.


Basic principle of instruction. Preparing for teaching experiences, organizing for instruction, and working in a teacher aiding situation. This course is part of Professional Term B.


The purpose of this course is to extend your knowledge of reading/writing, instructional strategies, methodology, and assessment procedures used in middle and secondary grades. We will explore the following content areas: evaluation of instructional materials, comprehension instruction, learning vocabulary, reading and writing across the curriculum, assessment of student progress, diversity in the classroom, and current approaches to content reading and writing.


Survey of the psychology of the identification of, and the methods of instruction for the exceptional child, including the learning disabled, with special emphasis on characteristics and methods of instruction for cross-categorical special education students.


As the first clinical experience course in the Teacher Education Program, this course requires teacher candidates to observe and teacher aide in a classroom in order to demonstrate an understanding of the classroom environment along with instructional and assessment practices. Teacher Aiding experiences include focused reflection on Danielson's Framework for Teaching and edTPA. Candidates take this clinical twice.


Mini-teachers meet regularly with School of Education faculty to share and reflect on the experience and prepare for the edTPA. There will be a minimum of 35 hours of mini-teaching in a local school in connection with methods courses. The student must meet the required grade point average and have a receipt by the School of Education of meeting the Illinois basic skills requirement.


Supervised observation and teaching in a school and grade level appropriate to the program and licensure endorsement sought by the candidate. The candidates will complete one 60 day (approximately 12 week) student teaching clinical experience. The candidate must meet the required grade and GPA requirement, pass the state content-area test, and be fully admitted into the Teacher Education Program prior to beginning student teaching.


As the capstone course in the teacher education program, this course enables students to create personal syntheses of their educational experiences as university students and as future educators. Students will develop their own philosophy of teaching. Students will assemble professional portfolios and prepare for teacher certification. Part of Professional Term D. Co-requisite: EDUC 4100, 4110, or 4120.