Undergraduate Programs

Program Requirements

Biomedical Sciences at North Park combines major course work, general education, and electives all while emphasizing safety in the laboratory and gaining hands-on laboratory skills utilizing state-of-the-art equipment in the Johnson Center for Science and Community Life.

Major Requirements (BA)

Course descriptions for all BIOL courses are available at the bottom of this page.

Prerequisites and supporting courses:

  • General Chemistry I (CHEM 1150)
  • General Chemistry II (CHEM 1160)
  • Survey of Organic Chemistry (CHEM 1021)/Survey of Biochemistry ( CHEM 1031) or Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

Required Courses:

  • Introduction to Human Anatomy (BIOL 1250)
  • Introduction to Cell Biology (BIOL 1260)
  • BIOL 2910 or BIOL 2930
  • BIOL 2270 or BIOL 2280
  • BIOL 3210 or BIOL 3230

16 semester hours of elective courses:

  • Topics: Cancer Biology (BIOL 2100)
  • Topics: Biological Nanomedicine (BIOL 2100)
  • Topics: Physiology of Disease (BIOL 2100)
  • Medical Terminology (BIOL 2360)
  • Parasitology (BIOL 2950)
  • Histology (BIOL 3140)
  • Exercise Physiology (BIOL 3160)
  • Bioinformatics (BIOL 3290)
  • Embryology (BIOL 3510)
  • Neuroscience (BIOL 3530)
  • Medical Microbiology (BIOL 3610)
  • Immunology (BIOL 3620)
  • Directed Research in Biology (BIOL 4930)
  • Internship (BIOL 4970)

Note: A student completing both Genetics and Molecular Biology will have one of the courses counted toward the 16 semester hours of electives for the major. A student completing both Advanced Human Physiology and Microbiology will have one of the courses counted toward the 16 semester hours of electives toward the major. Only 4 semester hours of directed research or internship can count toward the major.

Major Requirements (BS)

Prerequisite and supporting courses:

  • General Chemistry I (CHEM 1150)
  • General Chemistry II (CHEM 1160)
  • Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 2310)

Required Courses:

  • Introduction to Human Anatomy (BIOL 1250)
  • Introduction to Cell Biology (BIOL 1260)
  • Microbiology (BIOL 2910)
  • Advanced Human Physiology (BIOL 2930)
  • BIOL 2270 or BIOL 2280
  • BIOL 3210 or BIOL 3230

4 semester hours of:

  • BIOL 4930 Directed Research in Biology
  • BIOL 4970 Internship

16 semester hours of electives from the following courses:

  • Topics: Cancer Biology (BIOL 2100)
  • Topics: Biological Nanomedicine (BIOL 2100)
  • Topics: Physiology of Disease (BIOL 2100)
  • Medical Terminology (BIOL 2360)
  • Parasitology (BIOL 2950)
  • Histology (BIOL 3140)
  • Exercise Physiology (BIOL 3160)
  • Bioinformatics (BIOL 3290)
  • Embryology (BIOL 3510)
  • Neuroscience (BIOL 3530)
  • Medical Microbiology (BIOL 3610)
  • Immunology (BIOL 3620)

Note: A student completing both Genetics and Molecular Biology will have one of the courses counted toward the 16 semester hours of electives for the major. Only 4 semester hours of directed research or internship can count toward the major.

Academic Catalog

Core Curriculum

Course Descriptions

Click on the links below for course descriptions of all biology courses. For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

A presentation of the basic laws of chemistry with emphasis on stoichiometry, atomic and electronic structure, bonding, and the states of matter(gas, liquid, solid, and solution). Properties and reactions of some elements and simple compounds are used to exemplify the principles. Chemistry I and II form a year's sequential study of the principles of chemistry with applications describing elements and compounds and their reactions. This sequence meets the needs of students majoring in the physical and biological sciences. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH placement above 1010 or co-requisite MATH 1010.


Continuation of Chemistry I with emphasis on the energy changes associated with transformations of matter, kinetics of reactions, and the equilibrium considerations associated with reactions. General reactions of metals and non-metals and their compounds are also considered (includes an introduction to coordination compounds). Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.


A survey of the major functional classes of organic compounds including structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactions. Includes an introduction to the classes of natural products. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Student must have completed one year of high school general chemistry.


The chemistry of carbon compounds. Properties, synthesis, and reactions of saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydrocarbons, with emphasis on modern theoretical, mechanistic interpretations. Introduction to oxygen containing compounds. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


Includes structure and organization of human organ systems emphasizing skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and urogenital systems. Lab included with cadaver demonstrations. It is recommened that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Includes cell systems, cell cycles, cell function, energy production and metabolic systems, biological control systems, protein synthesis, and genetics. Lab included. It is recommended that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Selected aspects of bacteria, viral and eukaryotic parasite morphology, identification, physiology, and lifecycles, with a focus on how microbes affect human health, society and the environment. Includes an overview of the immune system's function, dysfunction, and modulation. Lab included.


Structure and function of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, muscular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the body. Lab included.


Survey of major animal phyla. Relationships between structure and function. Emphasis on the diversity of animal forms. Relationships of organisms with each other and with their environment. Lab included. Writing research course.


Survey of the plant kingdom and related organizsms from algae to flowering plants. Identification of campus Vascular plants. Basic life processes including photosynthesis, plant development, reproductive cycles, flowering and fruiting responses, and the ecological importance and conservation of plants. A WR emphasis with research term paper, experimental lab write-up and career development components. Lab included.


An introduction to Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance patterns as well as molecular genetics and biotechnology. Lab included.


A study of genes and gene regulation of living organisms at the molecular level. Particular attention will be given to modern biotechnology, genomics, and gene functions. Lab included.


Selected topics in biology covered on a rotating basis. Lab included with some topics. Some topics will have prerequisites (see annual class schedule).


This course utilizes a programmed learning text/workbook to present a broad vocabulary base in medical terminology while developing the skills needed to "decode" newly encountered technical terms. Classwork is supported and extended through the use of online modules allowing individual pacing. Medical terminology is required or recommended for many health professions including pre-medicine, occupational and physical therapy, physician's assistant, athletic training, and nursing.


This course emphasizes the geography, life cycles, clinical presentations and impact of parasitic diseases on global health. Protozoans, nematodes, trematodes, cestodes and arthropods will be covered.


Micro-anatomy of vertebrate tissues with emphasis on mammals. Lab included.


Study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory systems, stressing the effects of exercise on those systems. Lab included. Cross-listed with EXS 3160.


The completion of genome projects for many species resulted in the establishment of genome and other related databases. A new biology subject, bioinformatics, has been developed to study genetics and other biological sciences by using these databases and computational analytical tools. It is used in research and industrial development from agriculture to medicine. This course is designed for students to understand the basic concept of biological databases as well as to acquire hands-on learning experience in these modern tools.


Germ cell formation, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, and organogenesis in vertebrates. Extra-embryonic membranes and their functions. Study of the frog, the chick, and the pig. Lab included.


Topics included but not limited to neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and the neural networks of motor/sensory pathways, special senses, movement, language, emotion, and memory. Relevant diseases and conditions corresponding to the topics covered will also be discussed. Laboratory included during the lecture meeting times.


Course includes identification of a wide variety of pathogenic organisms, study of infectious diseases and treatments, and interpretation of laboratory tests used to identify etiological agents. Lab included.


A study of the immune system, stressing its role in protecting humans from the pathogenic microbes, by naturally and through medical intervention. Includes dysfunction associated with hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity. Clinically important immunological tests used in diagnostics will be presented. Lab included.


This course is open to Biology majors who have completed 20 sh of BIOL courses at North Park with at least a GPA of 3.0 in NPU Biology prerequisite, supporting, and required courses. Students will work under the direction of a faculty mentor on a novel research project culminating in a formal presentation. Permission of the faculty mentor and the department is required prior to enrollment in this course. A maximum of 4 sh may be taken. Requires instructors consent for enrollment.


On-site apprenticeship at an approved business or organization. A maximum of 4 semester hours of credit can count toward the major. The student must have completed at least 16 sh of credit in biology and have a GPA of at least 3.00 in NPU Biology prequisite, supporting, and required courses. Departmental approval required. Please refer to the internship section for additional requirements. Lab included with some topics.