Undergraduate Programs

Program Requirements

Students who complete the major requirements for a bachelor of arts (BA) or bachelor of science (BS) in chemistry will develop an appreciation for the role chemistry plays in the world and will be prepared for graduate school or careers as responsible citizens in chemical industry, health sciences, or education.

Major Requirements (BA)

Required semester hours

34 hours of major coursework
46 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Major Requirements (BS)

Required semester hours

38 hours of major coursework
46 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Notes:

  • For Departmental Honors in Chemistry, students are required to take CHEM 4000 (4 sh) in addition to the degree requirements listed above.
  • CHEM 4910 or 4970, or a summer research experience, is recommended for students interested in a research career or graduate school.

Minor Requirements

24 semester hours (sh)

  • Required core courses: CHEM 1150, 1160, 2310, 2320
  • Elective courses: Any additional 8 sh in chemistry courses numbered 2000 or higher.

Academic Catalog

Core Curriculum

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

Analysis of polynomial, rational, algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions.


Beginning calculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, mean value theorem, applications of derivatives, antiderivatives, Riemann Sums, introduction to the definite integrals. Uses computers. Lab included. Student should have completed four years of high school math.


Continuation of MATH 1510. Fundamental theorem of calculus, evaluation of definite integrals, applications of definite integrals, introduction to differential equations, infinite sequences and series. Uses computers. Lab included.


This course is a trig-based introductory course in physics for health science majors. The course will cover kinematics, dynamics, circular motion, gravitation, conservation of energy and momentum, systems in equilibria, rotations, and properties of matter and fluids. Lab is included in this course. Knowledge of trigonometry or permission of instructor is required to register for this course.


This course is the second semester of a trigonometry-based introductory course in physics for health science majors. The course will cover thermodynamics, electric fields and potentials, DC circuits, magnetic fields and forces, AC circuits, geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum theory, atomic theory, and nuclear physics. Lab is included in this course.


This course is the first semester of a calculus-based introductory physics course for science majors. Topics to be covered include kinematics, dynamics, energy and momentum, rotational motion, gravitation, equilibria, properties of materials, fluids, wave motion, sound, and simple harmonic oscillations. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills as well as conceptual understanding of the material. Lab is included in this course. Basic knowledge of trigonometry is assumed. Calculus is recommended.


This course is the second semester of a calculus-based introductory physics course for science majors. Topics to be covered include thermodynamics, electrical fields and forces, electric potential, DC circuits, magnetic fields and forces, AC circuits, geometrical and physical optics, quantum theory, atomic theory and structure, and nuclear structure, decay, and reactions. Emphasis will be placed on problem solving skills as well as conceptual understanding of the material. Lab is included in this course.


A presentation of the basic laws of chemistry with emphasis on stoichiometry, atomic and electronic structure, bonding, and the states of matter(gas, liquid, solid, and solution). Properties and reactions of some elements and simple compounds are used to exemplify the principles. Chemistry I and II form a year's sequential study of the principles of chemistry with applications describing elements and compounds and their reactions. This sequence meets the needs of students majoring in the physical and biological sciences. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH placement above 1010 or co-requisite MATH 1010.


Continuation of Chemistry I with emphasis on the energy changes associated with transformations of matter, kinetics of reactions, and the equilibrium considerations associated with reactions. General reactions of metals and non-metals and their compounds are also considered (includes an introduction to coordination compounds). Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.


Concepts in structure and bonding, periodic properties, molecular symmetry and its relationship to spectroscopy, coordination chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of selected elements. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


The chemistry of carbon compounds. Properties, synthesis, and reactions of saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydrocarbons, with emphasis on modern theoretical, mechanistic interpretations. Introduction to oxygen containing compounds. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


Continuation of organic Chemistry I, emphasizing carbonyl and nitrogen containing compounds. Determination of molecular structure via IR, UV, NMR, and mass spectral methods. Introduction to the structure and properties of natural products and biomolecules. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A study of equilibrium with special emphasis on acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and heterogeneous ionic equilibria. The laboratory is aimed primarily at developing quantitative laboratory skill. Three hours lecture and six hours laboratory per week.


A seminar designed to help students acquire: 1) essential chemistry information technology skills, including use of electronic databases and mastery of chemistry-related software; 2) an understanding of how chemistry research is funded, conducted, and published; and 3) an appreciation of the ethics, responsibilities, and expectations of professional chemists in a global society.


Kinetic theory of gases and the elements of thermodynamics applied to physical and chemical systems, including solutions and reactions. Fundamentals of reactions kinetics, including the study of catalysis, reaction mechanisms, and transition state theory applied to unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A study of the fundamentals of quantum mechanics applied to atoms and molecules. Applications to spectroscopy, including the study of lasers. Four hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.


A series of seminars by chemical professionals, faculty, and students participating in undergraduate research. Provides students with exposure to current research topics in chemistry. One hour biweekly seminar, repeatable. Pass/fail. Cannot be used as a major elective course.


An on-site experience in industry. Recommended for BS Chemistry students interested in obtaining placement in the field after graduation.