Music Program Requirements featured image background

Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Major Requirements

40 hours of major coursework
120 total credits for graduation

Prerequisite: MUS 2060 (4sh)

General Studies Concentration

Music History (6 sh) 3010, 3020

Theory (24 sh): 1080, 1110, 1120, 2000, 2110, 2130, 2140, 3130, 3140, 4160 and one from: 3150, 4150, 4165, or 4175

Performance Practica (4 sh): 0100 (8 semesters); 1005;

Keyboard Skills (0 sh): 1010 and 1020, Level II Proficiency required; 2155; 2970; AMUS 4900

Ensemble (0 sh): 4 years Brass,

Percussion, String or Woodwind: Required 4 years: (strings) MUS 0750, (brass/woodwind/percussion) MUS 0700 or MUS 0725

Guitar: Required at least 2 years in MUS 0700, MUS 0725, MUS 0750, MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 2 years in MUS 0855, MUS 3770, MUS 3850.

Piano and Organ: Required at least 2 years in or accompanying an ensemble (based on ability) such as the MUS 0700, MUS 0725, MUS 0750, MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 2 years in or accompanying MUS 0855 or MUS 3770.

Voice: Required at least 3 years in MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 1 year in MUS 0855 or MUS 3890.

Applied Music (6 sh): must include 4 sh of AMUS 3010

Electives (10 sh): Must be non-music (AMUS or MUS) and cannot be counted for Core Curriculum.

Composition concentration

Music History (6 sh) 3010, 3020

Theory (24 sh): 1080, 1110, 1120, 2000, 2110, 2130, 2140, 3130, 3140, 4160 and one from: 3150, 4150, 4165, or 4175

Performance Practica (4 sh): 0100 (8 semesters); 1005;

Keyboard Skills (0 sh): 1010 and 1020, Level II Proficiency required; 2155; 2970; AMUS 4900

Ensemble (0 sh): 4 years

Brass, Percussion, String or Woodwind: Required 4 years: (strings) MUS 0750, (brass/woodwind/percussion) MUS 0700 or MUS 0725

Guitar: Required at least 2 years in MUS 0700, MUS 0725, MUS 0750, MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 2 years in MUS 0855, MUS 3770, MUS 3850.

Piano and Organ: Required at least 2 years in or accompanying an ensemble (based on ability) such as the MUS 0700, MUS 0725, MUS 0750, MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 2 years in or accompanying MUS 0855 or MUS 3770.

Voice: Required at least 3 years in MUS 0800 or MUS 0810. No more than 1 year in MUS 0855 or MUS 3890.

Applied Music (6 sh): must include 4 sh of AMUS 3010

Electives (10 sh): Must be non-music (AMUS or MUS) and cannot be counted for Core Curriculum.

Jazz Studies (Instrumental) concentration

Music History (6 sh) 3010, 3075

Theory (22 sh): 1080, 1110, 1120, 2110, 2120, 2130, 2140, 3130, 3150 and 4175

Performance Practica (4 sh): 0100 (8 semesters); 1005;

Keyboard Skills (0 sh): 1010 and 1020, Level II Proficiency required; 2970, 3155 ; AMUS 4900 Ensemble (0 sh): 4 years: 0700, 0725 and/or 3710, by advisement.

Applied Music (8 sh): by advisement.

Electives (10 sh): Must be non-music (AMUS or MUS) and cannot be counted for Core Curriculum.

Minor Requirements:

20 semester hours

Academic Catalog  Core Curriculum

Search for Courses

Course Descriptions

The following descriptions are a sample of courses you may take as a music major. For a complete list of required courses, please review the academic catalog.

This course is designed to offer students opportunities to listen to a variety of concerts and recitals, and to perform as soloists as well. In addition, guest artists conduct master classes on occasion during the Thursday afternoon sessions. Students registered for this course have a set number of requirements to attend General and Class Recitals that occur on Thursday afternoons, evening and weekend concerts, and recitals from the School of Music Concert Calendar. Students also have specific performance requirements associated with the General and Class Recitals.


A select group of wind, rhythm, and percussion players determined by audition. Repertoire includes music for large jazz groups from the big band era to the present. An on-campus concert is presented each term, along with occasional outside performances.


Open to all wind and percussion players, this group is dedicated to the performance of wind ensemble music, both original music and transcriptions. Performances include on-campus concerts each term.


Devoted to the study and preparation of orchestral literature from the Baroque era to the present through regular rehearsal and performance. All instrumentalists are welcome. Principal positions and general seating are determined by audition. Orchestra Rehearsals and Concerts are centered around Education in Human Values (based on five universal core values - truth, love, peace, right conduct and non-violence) and serve as a model for the Certificate in Music for Social Change and Human Values.


A select group of experienced choristers, determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with regular national and foreign tours. The University Choir performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music. Cross-listed with MUS 5800.


A select group of female singers determined by audition. Emphasis is placed on vocal development and performance, with major appearances annually on and off campus, and with national and foreign tours periodically. The Women's Chorale performs a varied repertoire of sacred and secular music.


A select ensemble of singers drawn from the larger Gospel Choir by audition. The repertoire features all forms of gospel as well as traditional spirituals. The emphasis is on off-campus performances with a major tour every other year.


Introduction to the Music Profession offers Bachelor of Arts or Music students to begin to make connections between their music study, the total academic program, and post-undergraduate activities. It will also provide a setting in which to share perceptions about intended professions; this process will then in turn create a supportive atmosphere to ease the transition from high school and prior artistic settings, to college, and eventually to the workplace. Guests who work in a variety of music fields will be invited to selected classes, and students will be assigned readings that will act as a basis for in-class discussions. Other goals of the course include an intensive focus on the ethical dimensions of the music profession, and an exploration of professional habits that will support success in the future.

An introduction to basic skills and concepts that are foundational to further studies in music. Topics in music theory, aural skills, and keyboard harmony will be taught against the contextual background of a broad overview of stylistic periods in music history.

Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in diatonic music of graded difficulty.

Continuation of sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to music rudiments including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, scale degrees, intervals, melodies and harmony in a diatonic music of graded difficulty.

Introduction to the craft of composition. Exercises and guided projects aimed at honing technique and developing a personal voice. Co-requisite: MUS 2130 or by permission of instructor.

An introduction to the cultures and historical developments of major world regions and their global interactions, focusing on the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries, using music as the primary form of cultural analysis. Music will be studied from an ethno-musicological perspective to provide insight into several world cultures and the historical events that shaped them. Listening and analysis will be components of this course.

Sight singing and ear training through an aural approach to more advanced music including recognition, reproduction, and dictation. Includes rhythms, intervals, an introduction of chromaticism in scale patterns, melodies, and harmony.

Study of basic elements of diatonic music. Topics include triadic harmony, non-chord tones, melodic organization, phrase structure, cadences.

Continuing study of the principles of diatonic music. Topics include elements of melodic structure; pitch and rhythm, embellishing tones, melodic form and composition, and part writing with triads and seventh chords.

An introduction to current software programs and their applications for music education, composition, and production. Music graphics, sequencing and pedagogical software and hardware will be used in this course.

All students must register for this course in the semester of their Sophomore Conference.

This survey of the history of western music from the Baroque period through the mid-Romantic period is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.

Study of principles of chromaticism in tonal music, including secondary functions, modulation, mode mixture, altered pre-dominants, and other advanced chromatic harmony. Formal analysis, introduction to counterpoint, study of inventions, and fugue. Short composition projects and analysis of 19th century works.

Study of compositional techniques in late 19th and 20th century music. Topics include linear chromaticism, use of synthetic scales and modes, post-tonal techniques in both centric, freely atonal and serial contexts. Introduction to pitch-class set theory. Analysis of major works in each of these areas.

This survey of the history of western music from the late Romantic period through the present time is designed to familiarize students with the genres, musical styles and important personalities of the eras. Through active listening and analysis, students will become familiar with the musical styles of the periods. Structured writing assignments will reflect professional scholarship in the field of music.

A survey of the history of jazz. The material will be approached through selected readings, recorded listening examples, classroom discussion, and special projects.


Harmonic studies in jazz and pop idioms. Literature analysis, harmonization of melodies, keyboard realization, and voicing. Projects include small arrangements and original compositions.


A variety of small ensembles studying and performing a variety of chamber music literature. The instrumentation for the ensembles may specify brass, classical guitar, percussion, piano, woodwinds, or strings, or a combination thereof, and could also include other instruments or voice. By placement.


The North Park Classical Guitar Ensemble is a performance course similar to the String and Wind Ensembles currently offered by the School of Music. Students will form guitar trios, duos, and quartets. They will study and perform an extensive array of guitar ensemble literature spanning the Renaissance Era though the 21st Century. The guitar ensemble will perform a minimum of 2 times each semester, once on the Student Chamber Music Concert and once on the Thursday afternoon general recital. In the event there is not a scheduled Student Chamber Performance, the ensemble will explore other performance opportunities or, at the very least, appear twice on the Thursday afternoon general recital. Additional performances throughout the semester will be encouraged. In addition to class time, student practice and preparation time will be required. By placement.


The Chamber Singers is a small, select group of singers, that performs music from many and diverse styles and periods. The goal for this ensemble is to function as a group of soloists in the true chamber style, performing music that profits from intimate renderings. Students participate in multiple performances both on and off campus including regular national and foreign tours. Auditions are competitive and based on the needs of the ensemble. Cross-listed with MUS 5890.


Study of the principles of counterpoint through analysis of Baroque era contrapuntal genres and written exercises using a modified species approach.


A study of the ranges, techniques, timbres, and scoring of traditional orchestral instruments. Arranging for small instrumental ensembles is emphasized.


Introduction to the craft of songwriting. Exercises and guided projects aimed at writing and setting original lyrics as well as existing texts. Emphasis on songwriting related to faith expression.


Practical techniques of arranging music for a variety of vocal and instrumental mediums and in a variety of stylistic genres. Focus on arranging for small ensembles found both in school and church contexts.


Students required by their degree tracks to perform recitals should register for this course in the semester in which the recital is performed, most typically during the senior year.