North Park University - Chicago North Park University - Chicago

Category: Stories

I Chose North Park: “Christian university with a personal touch,” Carmen Velazquez-Alvarez C’16

Carmen Velazquez-Alvarez C’16, conflict transformation studies alumna, shares why she chose North Park.

Carmen Velazquez-Alvarez C’16, conflict transformation studies alumna, shares why she chose North Park.

I was looking for a Christian university with a personal touch. I attended a Covenant church in California’s Central Valley, and a member of my church—who was also my chemistry teacher and my mentor—urged me to apply to North Park.

I have a heart for the underserved and now serve California Central Valley’s large immigrant community. I plan to earn a Master’s in Social Work (MSW) and leverage my experience in the Valley to start a nonprofit organization.

It was as a student at North Park that I discovered my passion for service and realized I have the power to make a difference in others’ lives. I served as the president of the Latin American Student Organization (LASO) and cofounded a mentorship group for Latina students. I also served in campus ministry and interned at the YWCA.

At every step along my journey North Park, I was encouraged. I’m incredibly appreciative of the support I received and relationships I developed.

More of Carmen’s story

Posted on Categories Profile, StoriesTags , , ,

I Chose North Park: “I enjoyed the relationships most,” Michelle Dodson C’03

Michelle Dodson C’03, biblical and theological studies alumna, shares why she chose North Park.

Michelle Dodson C’03, biblical and theological studies alumna, shares why she chose North Park.

Michelle’s experience as a biblical and theological studies major helped prepare her professionally for the work she does in ministry today. Serving in campus ministry and engaging with college diversity “helped me develop a theology of racial reconciliation. It also gave me opportunities to learn how to communicate that theology.” Michelle serves as associate pastor of New Community Covenant Church in Bronzeville, a neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. She describes New Community as “an intentionally multiracial congregation that actively pursues racial reconciliation and social justice.” She’s currently working toward a PhD in sociology with a focus on multiracial congregations.

As a high school student, Michelle chose to come to North Park University because she was looking for a Christian liberal arts university that was small enough for her to get to know people. “I was attending a Covenant church in California at the time,” she says, “and my pastor suggested I apply to North Park.”

As it turned out, North Park was a great fit for Michelle. “The relationships that I built at North Park are what I enjoyed the most,” she says. “I have had the privilege of doing life and ministry with many of those people to this day.”

What’s more, she says, Michelle’s experience inside and outside of the classroom as a biblical and theological studies major helped prepare her professionally for the work she does in ministry today. “North Park was a great training ground for what I do,” she says. “It was as a student there that I got my first experiences leading in the areas of racial righteousness.” Serving in campus ministry and engaging with college diversity “helped me develop a theology of racial reconciliation. It also gave me opportunities to learn how to communicate that theology.”

Michelle serves as associate pastor of New Community Covenant Church in Bronzeville, a neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. She describes New Community as “an intentionally multiracial congregation that actively pursues racial reconciliation and social justice.” She’s currently working toward a PhD in sociology with a focus on multiracial congregations.

Posted on Categories Profile, StoriesTags , , ,

I Chose North Park: “personal and in the big city,” Tim Ahlberg C’13

Tim Ahlberg C’13, a business and economics alumnus, shares why he chose North Park.

Tim Ahlberg C’13, a business and economics alumnus, shares why he chose North Park.

Tim chose to attend North Park because he wanted to be in a big city, but at a college that felt personal. “I wanted to have relationships with my professors and mentors, and to live in a close-knit community where I could get to know other students from all different backgrounds,” he says. “And coming from a Covenant Church family, I knew I wanted to attend a Christian school, to be surrounded by others that shared my faith and would help me build and sustain my own faith throughout my formative college years.”

Maybe most important, Tim wanted a college environment that placed focus not just on finding a career, but living a life of significance and service. When he came to North Park, he got that environment—not only in the classroom, but in experiences around the campus and city. “There’s really nothing else like the community there that I’ve experienced before or after North Park. Students and faculty really all-in for your success, both personal and professional.”

He loved taking part in Chapel and College life services; was voted president of the student body; served with homeless ministries; and was captain of the men’s soccer team his senior year, being named an Academic All-American. “North Park is such a personal university that, no matter your area of study, your background, or your future pursuits, the entire campus feels like one community that exists because of and for each other,” Tim says. “I met amazing people who were so different than I was, and we learned so much from each others’ experiences and life stories.”

A business and economics major with a concentration in accounting and a minor in Spanish, Tim got to know his faculty members in North Park’s small class sizes. They encouraged him to study abroad in Guanajuato, Mexico, where he became fluent in Spanish. In his senior year, Tim received a Fulbright Binational Business Exchange Grant, which allowed him to complete a business internship and take MBA classes in in Mexico City. “None of this would have been possible without the support of the faculty and staff of North Park,” he says.

“By the time I started my full-time job in the United States, I was not only prepared with specific business acumen and skills gained through curriculum, but armed with a global perspective and bilingual capabilities that really set me apart in today’s competitive workforce,” Tim says.

As an assurance associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers, he focuses on accounting solutions and business operations improvements. “This includes traveling to business all over the country, and to Mexico, where I have been able to use my fluency in Spanish. I feel like North Park has prepared me beyond my peers for entering the global workforce.”

Posted on Categories Profile, StoriesTags , ,

The Wistrom Legacy: Tending to North Park University for nearly a Century

Carl Wistrom honored for 35 years of service in Physical Plant, following the legacy of his forebears

Carl Wistrom honored for 35 years of service in Physical Plant, following his father and grandfather

CHICAGO (February 27, 2017) — Carl Wistrom has served in Physical Plant since 1981, first as assistant director and then as director. Physical Plant is responsible for all of the behind-the-scenes work keeping North Park’s spaces functioning. Winter after winter, Carl oversees snow removal. Summer after summer, Carl’s led his team in the maintenance of campus buildings in preparation for the new school year. For 35 years and counting.

But the Wistrom family legacy at North Park stretches further back still: three generations of Wistroms have served North Park by supporting its campus. Carl Wistrom came to North Park just three years before his father, Ivar, retired from his role as campus engineer, a position similar to Carl’s. Ivar’s tenure began in 1947, shortly after his own father, Carl Wistrom (the elder), retired from that same role.

The elder Carl Wistrom, janitor and campus engineer at North Park between 1910 and 1945

Carl does have fond memories of his own father, who trained him in his work at North Park. “My dad was the master. He taught me a lot and had know-how that I don’t have.” More than knowledge, though, Ivar had a “great passion for North Park.” Indeed, this passion was hereditary. Carl notes that he has been truly blessed by the people he works with, and he remembers how his “dad had great people working with him” too.

Ivar Wistrom, chief engineer and physical plant manager from 1947–1984

At an all-staff gathering last month, President David L. Parkyn acknowledged that “as we celebrate Carl’s 35 years at North Park, we simultaneously want to recognize and honor the nearly century of service extended to North Park by each of these three men, Carl, Ivar, and Carl.”

In honor of the Wistrom family, Dr. Parkyn presented a plaque to Carl, which will be located near the entrance to the Physical Plant building.

The plaque reads:

Carl said that he was humbled to have his family honored in this way.

RELATED MATERIAL:

Historical photos courtesy of North Park University Archives.

Posted on Categories Blog, StoriesTags ,

North Park Receives Eighteenth-Century Eastern European Torah Scroll from Ken and Barbara Larson

The authentic Jewish Torah scroll was generously gifted to the University on February 9 during a dedication and celebration event in Anderson Chapel.

The authentic Jewish Torah was generously gifted during a February 9 dedication and celebration.

CHICAGO (February 22, 2017) — Ken and Barbara Larson are a warm couple who have been married for 52 years, having spent the past two in ministry gifting scrolls to Christian institutions. The Larson’s story centers around “saying yes to God.”

Mr. Larson, who is the founder of Slumberland Furniture, says that the couple had been told during a prayer meeting years earlier that they’d do ministry together. When they were invited by Josh McDowell—the Christian apologist—to Tajikistan to help with a program, they said “yes” to God, thinking that this could be their ministry together. Though that trip was canceled, they continued to say “yes” to God, landing them in South Korea with the apologist. There, McDowell shared about how he had recently purchased a Torah scroll and how it was the most impactful tool he’d experienced in more than 50 years of ministry. Not long after the trip to South Korea, the Larsons traveled to Israel with their family—35 members including children and grandchildren. When they returned to the States, they visited a seminary with Dr. Scott Carroll, an expert manuscript researcher.

There, Mr. Larson asked the Hebrew professors if they’d ever read from a Torah scroll. They all said that they’d never had the opportunity.

This was the turning point. Ken and Barbara looked at each other and knew that this was going to be their ministry together. As they had done so many times before, they said “yes” to God. They bought a collection of Torah scrolls and, since March of 2014, have given 32 to institutions around the world.

North Park is the 32nd recipient.

Barb Larson was happy to give the scroll to North Park because she’s a Chicagoan herself. “We feel right at home here.” She reminisced about her childhood, growing up living in an apartment on Montrose and Broadway. She attended Senn High School, which was, at the time, primarily Jewish. It was there that her love for Jewish people began. “It’s so thrilling to be back here and feel the energy that Chicagoland has.” Barb and Ken are most interested, though, in giving scrolls to institutions that have a respect for the word of God.

North Park—being Chicago-centered, intercultural, and rooted in faith—was a perfect match.

The Larsons have another special connection to North Park. “We love the Covenant church,” Barbara mentioned, because Ken attended Minnehaha Academy, a ministry affiliated with the Evangelical Covenant Church. The Larson’s five children went to Minnehaha and now they have grandchildren there. One grandson even attended North Park. “So, we feel a deep connection to the Covenant church.”

North Park’s Office of Advancement and the Seminary expressed gratitude for the gift with an elaborate and inspiring ceremony, featuring a traditional Jewish Torah Service liturgy, including readings and cantillations.

Dr. Rajkumar Boaz Johnson, professor of biblical and theological studies, and Skokie-based Rabbi Jeffrey Weill led the liturgy. Dr. Johnson sang the Shema before he and Rabbi Weill processed the scroll through the chapel. Dr. Johnson coached participants to, as the Torah passed them, touch their program to it and then kiss the program. This, he said, was an act of gratitude to God for his word.

Rabbi Weill lained the Torah text, the Song of the SeaLaining is melodious chanting of the scripture portion. The rabbi commented upon the exceptional beauty of the ornate scroll. Dr. James Bruckner, professor of biblical interpretation, presented the D’rash, an exposition of the text, in which he considered how the bones of Joseph were carried with the Israelites as a remembrance representing the story of God.

This, of course, is also true of the North Park-Larson scroll, a relic stewarded by God’s people as a remembrance of the story of God.

Seminary Dean Rev. Dr. David Kersten remarked that North Park has a heritage of gathering around the text. Receiving the scroll, he emphasized, is a reminder of North Park’s “ongoing call to read the sacred text and to repair our own lives and to repair the world through the reading of the text.”

Dr. Kristine Strand, chair of the Board of Trustees, explained in a letter to the Larsons that North Park is “an educational institution of deep Christian identity” and that it’s devoted to giving students opportunities to enrich their understanding of the Bible. The trustees are grateful that the North Park-Larson scroll will offer these opportunities for enrichment.

The scroll itself is decommissioned—no longer used in Jewish liturgical settings—and can now be used for exhibit, display, and teaching. It’s from the late 18th century with Ashkenazi origins, most likely from Poland. It has unusually beautiful orthography and unique decorative features adorning its letters. Dr. Carrol concluded that the scroll was a great labor of love for the scribe who produced it, and it was likely a point of pride for its original congregation.

It is now a point of pride for North Park, which is honored to be a part of this scroll’s rich history, a history that includes surviving the Holocaust.

The scroll will be housed in either the Brandel Library or the Seminary, kept within its handcrafted ark. The design of the ark—crafted by Dr. Johnson’s friend, Chris Olofson—was intended to be rugged to reflect the age of the scroll. It’s made of solid cypress, a wood indigenous to the Holy Land, and the vertical planking is intended to reflect the Mishkan, the Tabernacle. The Ark is supported by a maple plywood laminate base in the favored style of modern Swedish furniture. This reflects the support of the Swedish community—from which North Park was founded—for the Jewish community.

Dr. David Parkyn, president of North Park University, expressed gratitude to the Larsons and closed the ceremony with a prayer noting that the study of the holy scriptures has been central to North Park since its founding 125 years ago. The gift, he said, marks the school’s new level of commitment to the scriptures.

Posted on Categories News, StoriesTags ,

North Park University Named a Top Producer of U.S. Fulbright Students

Recognized for the third time, North Park has current Fulbright students in Macedonia, Mexico, and Peru.

Recognized for the third time, North Park has current Fulbright students in Macedonia, Mexico, and Peru.

CHICAGO (February 21, 2017) — North Park University, Chicago’s intercultural, Christian university, has been named a Top Producer of U.S. Fulbright Students for the third year. The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs announced the U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most 2016–2017 Fulbright U.S. Students. North Park was named alongside two other Illinois institutions, University of Chicago and Northwestern University. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program. Top-producing institutions are highlighted annually in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Three students from North Park University won Fulbright awards for 2016-2017: Katie Bast, Bethany Joseph, and Elizabeth Wallace. Read more about their stories.

North Park also has four semi-finalists for the 2017–2018 academic year, who are awaiting their final status from the respective countries.

“I am so very proud of our students and our Fulbright Committee,” said Dr. Linda Parkyn, professor of Spanish, who spearheads North Park’s efforts around Fulbright awards, serving as mentor and encourager to student applicants. She has been a Fulbright Scholar and twice a Fulbright Senior Specialist, and readily admits to having “Fulbrightis.” Good candidates, Dr. Parkyn says, have stellar grades, a keen interest in some other part of the world, involvement with immigrants and/or refugees at home, and knowledge of another language. “Fulbright is a prestigious award,” says Dr. Parkyn. “But to have this experience early in your life, to give back your first year out of college and become an American ambassador sharing language and culture, it will affect your career choices for the rest of your life—and affect change for good in our world!”

Dr. Linda Parkyn expressed deep pride and joy over the honor of North Park being named a Top Producer of U.S. Fulbright Students three times. Since 2008, the school has produced 19 Fulbright Student awards and leads its category—Master’s Institution— in Fulbright Student award winners.

Since its inception in 1946, the Fulbright Program has provided more than 370,000 participants—chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential—with the opportunity to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns. Over 1,900 U.S. students, artists, and young professionals in more than 100 different fields of study are offered Fulbright Program grants to study, teach English, and conduct research annually. The Fulbright U.S. Student Program operates in over 140 countries throughout the world. Lists of Fulbright recipients are available at www.fulbrightonline.org/us.

The Fulbright Program is funded through an annual appropriation made by the United States Congress to the Department of State. Participating governments and host institutions, corporations, and foundations in foreign countries and in the United States also provide direct and indirect support.

In the United States, the Institute of International Education administers and coordinates the activities relevant to the Fulbright U.S. Student Program on behalf of the Department of State, including conducting an annual competition for the scholarships.The Fulbright Program also awards grants to U.S. scholars, teachers and faculty to conduct research and teach overseas. In addition, some 4,000 new foreign Fulbright students and scholars come to the United States annually to study for graduate degrees, conduct research and teach foreign languages.

The Fulbright Program also awards grants to U.S. scholars, teachers and faculty to conduct research and teach overseas. In addition, some 4,000 new foreign Fulbright students and scholars come to the United States annually to study for graduate degrees, conduct research and teach foreign languages.

For more information about the Fulbright Program, visit http://eca.state.gov/fulbright.

ABOUT NORTH PARK UNIVERSITY

North Park University is Chicago’s intercultural, Christian University.

To learn more about North Park visit www.northpark.edu/about.

Posted on Categories News, StoriesTags , , ,

A Message from the Board of Trustees

A Message from Board Chair Dr. Kristine Strand and ECC President Gary Walter.

A Message from Board Chair Dr. Kristine Strand and ECC President Gary Walter

Dr. David Parkyn, president of North Park University since 2006, has announced his retirement to follow the completion of this 2016–17 academic year. North Park University is the university of the Evangelical Covenant Church (ECC).

“With gratitude and respect, the Board of Trustees congratulates Dr. Parkyn on the success of North Park University during his 11 years as President. The Board wishes to express our heartfelt thanks for his service and leadership to North Park,” commented Kristine Strand, chair of the Board of Trustees for the University.

President David L. ParkynDuring President Parkyn’s tenure, North Park saw advances on many fronts. Dr. Parkyn presided over Campaign North Park, the largest fundraising effort in the university’s history raising over $63 million in financial commitments which resulted in the completion of the state of the art G. Timothy and Nancy Johnson Center for Science and Community Life. Under his direction, North Park University has been recognized for its leadership in “first family member to college” student enrollment and retention, as well as the ethnic and socio-economic diversity of the student body. Further, nineteen students have received Fulbright awards, making North Park “a top producer” of Fulbright recipients.

“The Board of Trustees also expresses deep appreciation to Dr. Linda Parkyn, Professor of Spanish, who capably led North Park’s Honors Congress,” Dr. Strand continued. “Her leadership of the program was instrumental in the development of Fulbright award winners to date.”

In a letter to the campus community, President Parkyn wrote, “The past 11 years at North Park have been personally and professionally fulfilling for both Linda and me. We have come to deeply love this institution as well as its students, faculty, and staff. Together we have made good (perhaps on occasion even great!) strides toward important objectives. Now is a good time for someone else to step into leadership and guide the school into the coming years.”

The North Park University Board of Trustees will announce interim leadership for the university following its meetings, February 17–18. Also, the Board looks forward to leading the process to identify a nominee for the next university president who will guide the North Park community in its aspiration to be the nation’s leading city-centered Christian university. The candidate will be called formally to the position by the Covenant Annual Meeting anticipated in June 2018.

Plans will be announced for an appreciation event for the Parkyns later this spring.

Gary Walter, President of the ECC, stated that “President Parkyn’s ethos is for the flourishing of each student. It has been his driving hope that at North Park students would know that each of their lives makes a difference. North Park University’s mission as an intentionally Christian university, is to prepare students for lives of significance and service. Dr. Parkyn has given himself unreservedly to that aim.”

“We wish President and Dr. Linda Parkyn the very best in their retirement as they look forward to more time with family and other pursuits,” said Dr. Strand.

Posted on Categories News, StoriesTags , ,

A Message from President Parkyn

Crossing a new threshold.

President David L. ParkynDear members of the North Park Faculty and Staff,

As each school year begins, we welcome new undergraduates to our campus at a celebration we call “Threshold”—a symbolic crossing from one place or time or period of life to another. At commencement we usher graduates across another threshold, this time leading away from their years at North Park toward another season in life—now directed as a life of significance and service.

I’m writing today to inform you that Linda and I have decided to cross a special threshold of our own this year. Last week I confirmed with our Board of Trustees my intent to retire as university president, and Linda as a professor, at the end of the current academic year.

This past September we joined with alumni and friends to celebrate North Park’s 125th anniversary. As I considered the story of the University over these many years I also reflected on my own, more limited, years on our campus. I found this to be a valuable exercise which prompted some larger questions for Linda and me.

In my inauguration address, I spoke about the unique voice each individual brings to life. Then I asked whether an institution might also have a voice. I commented: “Might North Park University have a voice? Might North Park have a particular syntax and diction, punctuation and grammar that are uniquely its own?”

As a campus community, we have worked together over the past 11 years to build upon the school’s legacy commitments by advancing learning on our campus today in ways that are particular to North Park. This is the voice I hear at North Park today:

  • Out of a commitment to inclusion and student success, together we have cultivated a campus-wide spirit of hospitality to welcome all to North Park; we “contribute to the needs of the saints (and) extend hospitality to strangers.”
  • We have advanced in impressive ways the Board’s 1995 objective to significantly increase diversity at North Park, accomplished in a pronounced way in student enrollment; “people (are coming) from east and west, north and south, to eat at the kingdom of God” on this campus.
  • We are actively leveraging our location in a global city as we embrace Chicago as our classroom; today we “seek the welfare of the city.”
  • With the deep generosity of friends from across the country—“like trees . . . which yield their fruit in its season”—we successfully completed Campaign North Park, leading to the design and construction of the Johnson Center to advance learning in the classroom and far beyond.

This is an exceptional voice in the higher education landscape. We have much to celebrate!

Linda likewise has been part of the campus community during our years here. She has taught side-by-side with dear colleagues who love Spanish as much as she does. Beyond this, she has shaped learning at North Park by designing and teaching in the Honors Congress. Most significant, perhaps, has been her mentorship with a small number of students each year applying for Fulbright awards. We have achieved 10 consecutive years of successful student applications and in multiple years the University has been named a “Fulbright Top Producer.”

Our decision to retire is set in these contexts. The past 11 years at North Park have been personally and professionally fulfilling for both of us. We have come to deeply love this institution, its students, and each of you. Together with you, we have made good (perhaps on occasion even great!) strides toward important objectives. Now is a good time for someone else to step into leadership and guide the school into the coming years. You’ll have the great privilege of being part of this transition to a new leader, remaining constant in faith, learning, and service at North Park.

This has been a special community for Linda and me. Consider this: over these past 11 years, you have mourned with us the passing of our four parents, and you have celebrated with us the birth of our six grandchildren! Thank you for welcoming us when we came in 2006, and to all who have joined the University since that time please know of the joy you brought to us in your own choice to be part of North Park. Linda and I have been honored to be your colleagues.

Linda reminds me often that in Spanish the verb “to retire” is “jubilarse,” literally translated as “to make oneself jubilant!” Our plans for personal life after transitioning from North Park remain fluid. We will return to the east coast to be close to children and grandchildren, and we’re confident further plans will come into focus in due time.

Most certainly we look forward to being together with you during the remaining weeks of the academic year. We’ll celebrate as our graduates cross their threshold from North Park, and Linda and I will follow soon after as we greet the next season of our own life.

With fondness for each of you,

David Parkyn Signature

David L. Parkyn (and of course, Linda as well)
President

Posted on Categories Blog, StoriesTags

Lilly Endowment Awards $750,000 Grant to North Park University

Pastors receive financial management and leadership training through School of Business and Nonprofit Management, Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management, and the Seminary.

Pastors receive financial management and leadership training through School of Business and Nonprofit Management, Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management, and the Seminary.

Published by PR Newswire

CHICAGO (February 14, 2017) — Lilly Endowment’s National Initiative to Address Economic Challenges Facing Pastoral Leaders awarded North Park University with a $750,000 grant to provide specialized curriculum and programming geared for pastors and church leaders. To lead financially strong congregations, pastoral leaders need to be well versed in accounting, finance, human resources, and operations. As such, the seasoned educators from North Park University’s School of Business and Nonprofit Management (SBNM) and the Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management (Axelson Center) will work with North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) to readily offer pastors financial management and leadership training.

North Park joins other higher education grant recipients Northwestern, Villanova, and Seton Hall universities, as well as magazine and online publication Christianity Today. Rev. Dr. David Kersten, dean of North Park Theological Seminary and vice president of church relations remarks, “I hope this national effort will form a closer relationship between business schools and seminaries.”

With North Park’s existing dual master degree program in seminary and business, the University is well-positioned to provide immediate instruction to pastoral leaders. In courses from both the business and nonprofit management school and seminary, students acquire the business skills they need to run financially strong congregations, in conjunction with their calling to serve the church.

Coursework includes language and content unique to churches, pastors, and church leadership. Several flexible learning options featuring the dual focus in business and church leadership, include:

  • Master’s degree in church administration
  • Doctoral degree in Church leadership
  • Joint MDiv and MBA or MNA programs (dual degree program in seminary and business/nonprofit management)
  • School of Business and Nonprofit Management five-course certificate program in
    • Church administration
    • Human resource management
    • Nonprofit financial management
    • Nonprofit marketing analysis and consumer behavior
    • Principles of church administration
    • Nonprofit board governance and volunteer management

Non-credit options include:

  • Custom-designed workshops for specific organizations and/or groups
  • Annual conference
  • BootCamp and workshops

“We encourage pastors and lay leaders to consider our offerings as they are further developed over the coming three-year period. We will offer a continuum of educational opportunities, both credit and non-credit, to strengthen financial and leadership capacity,” says Wesley E. Lindahl, North Park’s Dean of the School of Business and Nonprofit Management.

Resources at North Park: School of Business and Nonprofit Management (SBNM), North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS), and the Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management (Axelson Center)

Another resource within SBNM is the Axelson Center for Nonprofit Management (Axelson Center). Founded in 1999, the Axelson Center offers expertise in teaching a wide range of management and leadership topics on a non-credit basis. That expertise has often been directed towards faith-based nonprofit organizations and will be joined with that of SBNM and NPTS to ensure the provision of a wide range of opportunities for faith leaders through this new initiative supported by the Lilly Endowment.

Scholarships Available

In concert with North Park’s philosophy of offering access to quality higher education, participants are eligible to receive 50 percent scholarships towards certificates and custom workshops.

Posted on Categories News, StoriesTags ,

GRAMMY-Nominated Gospel Singer and Chicago-Based Artists to Perform at North Park University

North Park University celebrates Black History Month with series of concerts, poetry readings, lectures, and art exhibits

North Park University celebrates Black History Month with series of concerts, poetry readings, lectures, and art exhibits

Published in PR Newswire

CHICAGO (February 2, 2017) — North Park University, Chicago’s urban, intercultural, Christian university, is hosting events centered around the ultimate question of the human experience. Surrounding the campus theme, What is Beauty?, are a variety of events which are open to the public and run February 3 through April 5 on North Park’s campus in Chicago.

North Park invites the community to experience these expressions of words, songs, and art, while recognizing Black History Month with performances by GRAMMY-nominated gospel singer Jonathan McReynolds and poet Jackie Perry.

Featured Events

Beauty, Identity, and Social Change
Friday, February 10, 10:30 am
Isaacsson Chapel

Dr. Reggie Williams, Assistant Professor of Christian Ethics, McCormick Seminary speaking on how the revolution in conventions of beauty were integral to the social changes that occurred in the Harlem Renaissance.

Free admission.

Beauty in Diversity Concert
Saturday, February 11, 7:30 pm
Anderson Chapel

Performance by GRAMMY-nominated gospel singer Jonathan McReynolds headlines this concert sponsored by the Office of Diversity. Poet Jackie Perry will also perform along with other artists and musicians from across Chicago.

Tickets are $20 (discounted for North Park students and faculty).
All proceeds go to North Park’s Office of Diversity.
Purchase tickets online.

 

Beauties Sacred and Secular: Aretha Franklin and Gospel Music
Wednesday, April 5, 3:30 pm
Anderson Chapel

Aaron Cohen, author of Amazing Grace, explores the making of Aretha Franklin’s double platinum 1972 gospel album Amazing Grace. This event includes a Gospel Choir concert.

Free admission.

CAMPUS THEME EVENTS

Posted on Categories News, StoriesTags