North Park University - Chicago North Park University - Chicago

Colleges and Schools

Program Requirements

Students who complete the requirements for a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree will be qualified to apply for the professional nurse licensing examination, the NCLEX-RN. This program for pre-licensure is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

Major Requirements

47 prerequisite hours
53 hours of major coursework
46 Core Curriculum credits
120 total credits for graduation

Minor Requirements:

20 semester hours

ACADEMIC PLANNING GUIDE

CORE CURRICULUM

ACADEMIC CATALOG

Course Descriptions

For a complete list of all North Park’s programs and course offerings, review the academic catalog.

Includes structure and organization of human organ systems emphasizing skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, nervous, and urogenital systems. Lab included with cadaver demonstrations. It is recommened that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Includes cell systems, cell cycles, cell function, energy production and metabolic systems, biological control systems, protein synthesis, and genetics. Lab included. It is recommended that the student complete one year of high school laboratory science.


Selected aspects of bacteria, viral and eukaryotic parasite morphology, identification, physiology, and lifecycles, with a focus on how microbes affect human health, society and the environment. Includes an overview of the immune system's function, dysfunction, and modulation. Lab included.


Structure and function of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine, muscular, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems of the body. Lab included.


A survey of the major functional classes of organic compounds including structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactions. Includes an introduction to the classes of natural products. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Student must have completed one year of high school general chemistry.


A survey of chemistry of cellular compounds. Introduction to the different classes of biochemicals. Introduction to bioenergetics and enzymology and to the major pathways of cellular chemical events. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.


Introduction to applied statistical analysis. Descriptive, correlational, and inferential statistics; concepts of population, sample, sampling distribution; elements of probability; parameters of discrete distributions; hypothesis testing: analysis of proportions, means, and variance; linear regression. Computer applications required. Cross-listed with MATH 1490.


An introduction to the methodology and the major content areas of psychology.


Studies physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development across the human lifespan. The course incorporates theories, methods, and research with both children and adults.


Problems, fields, and methods of sociology. Emphasis on a theoretical frame of reference to explain basic social processes, the role of culture in social behavior, the nature of social organization, and social and cultural change. Intensive reading in descriptive studies from a wide range of societies.


Math for the Generalist Nurse is designed to review basic math relevant to nursing pharmacology and provide the student with necessary knowledge and practice to master comprehensive dosage calculations in nursing practice.


Applies the science of nutrition to human needs throughout the life span. Includes major nutrition related health problems. Explores cultural and ethical issues and values related to nutrition, food consumption, hunger, and the environment. Connects to Christian, urban, and international issues.


Major pathophysiology concepts are explored using a physiological systems approach. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. Concepts from anatomy and physiology courses provide the foundation for exploring human dysfunction. Concepts learned in this course are basic to practice.



Introduces students to the mission, vision, philosophy, and distinctives of the North Park University School of Nursing; explores the concepts of professional nursing, the history of nursing and nursing education, the roles and settings where professional nurses practice, and envisions a preferred future for the profession.


Introduces students to the foundational concepts and beginning skills required in professional practice. Includes lecture, lab, and clinical.


Integrates knowledge from the natural and behavioral sciences to focus on holistic health assessment of adults. Includes assessment of spiritual, cultural, developmental, and nutritional aspects. Considers ethnic variables of normal assessment. Course culminates with students performing and recording a complete health assessment. Students will describe the role of the nurse in health assessment.


Based upon knowledge of liberal arts and sciences and basic nursing concepts, applies nursing theory to the care of adults with physiological disorders. The focus is patients who undergo surgery or have disorders in the respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and endocrine disorders. Applies theory and practice in acute care settings.


Introduces basic pharmacological concepts including drug classification, drug actions, routes of administration, drug standards, legislation and control, and nursing implications for patient use.


Major pathophysiology concepts are explored using a physiological systems approach. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations are used to study common disease processes. Concepts from anatomy and physiology courses provide the foundation for exploring human dysfunction. Concepts learned in this course are basic to practice.


Applies a caring philosophy and current knowledge, theory, and research to nursing care of diverse pregnant women, fetuses, newborns, and families. Explores cultural values, community resources, and ethical and spiritual issues related to childbearing. Uses acute and ambulatory care settings.


Based upon knowledge of liberal arts and sciences and basic nursing concepts, nursing theory is applied to the care of ill children and their families. Emphasizes Family Centered Care. Theory and practice in ambulatory and acute care settings. Patients and families are from urban, suburban, or rural environments. The Christian mission is integrated in the plan of care. A caring philosophy directs interaction with culturally and spiritually diverse families.


Issues and dilemmas in the health care system serve as a basis for examination of theories and principles of ethics. The spiritual domain is considered a valued context for decision-making.


Integrates knowledge of human development, behavior, and psychological theory; places emphasis on increasing self-awareness and therapeutic use of self and milieu. With assistance and use of collaborative skills, students develop decision-making skills in the psychiatric-mental health care delivery system in a way that communicates respect and understanding.


Based upon knowledge of liberal arts and sciences and Nursing of Adults I, nursing theory is applied to the care of adults with physiological disorders. The focus is patients who have cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, neuromuscular, and renal disorders typically seen in older adults. Applies theory and practice in acute care settings. Co-requisite: NURS 4202.


Focus is on "being old" in America and transitions that impact health of older adults and families. Explores issues related to the health care industry, access to health care, and health care management. Considers culturally specific issues, and ethics of health care at the end of life. Incorporates priorities of Healthy People 2010 and ANA standards of practice for gerontological nursing. Co-requisite: NURS 4201.


Applies gerontological concepts in student-selected activities. Students identify, plan, implement, and analyze the effectiveness of their acute and community-based service related activities that promote healthy lifestyles, enhance the quality of life, or support adaptive behaviors with the elderly. Requirements include a course project incorporating specific cultural and ethnic perspectives to provide optimal, individualized care.


Introduces elements of the research process with emphasis on becoming a consumer of research. Focus is on relevance of research findings to evidenced-based quality health care. Considers ethical issues in research.


Synthesizes knowledge in the science and practice of community health nursing, and is built upon and connected to the University's urban, intercultural, and Christian distinctives. Focuses on patterns that influence wellness, as well as potential barriers that place individuals, families, and communities at risk for major health problems. Includes health care delivery system and its effects on under-served consumers and professionals, community assessment, epidemiology, violence in the community, environmental & occupational health issues, world health issues, and home health hospice care. Applies theory and practice in community health settings.


Culminating nursing course. Synthesizes knowledge in arts and sciences, nursing theory, and current management principles in multi-complex health care settings. Includes leadership, management, and synthesis of multi-system disorders.


Examines and emphasizes the challenges and opportunities related to issues in health policy and health care from a local, national, and international perspective. Addresses the political, economic, legal, and ethical aspects of the United States Health Care policy and health care issues; their impact on patients; and mechanisms and strategies for political advocacy and influence.


Integrates leadership and management theory in the preparation of nurse leaders and managers who, through the functions of leading, managing and directing others in a variety of healthcare settings, will not only know how to use power appropriately, but will empower others in serving humankind.