Tag: liberal arts

High School Visit Day

High School Visit Day is a great way to get a jump-start on your college search. Designed specifically for current high school sophomores, juniors, and their families. This is a great opportunity to discover North Park and see if it is the right fit for you.

Highlights:
-Explore our campus oasis on a tour led by North Park students
-Get all your questions answered about the college admissions process and financial aid
-Eat in our dining hall and get a glimpse of what life looks like as a Viking

RSVP

Choose NPU Day

Don’t wait to start your life at North Park University. All admitted students and their families are invited to Choose NPU Day. Experience daily life as a Viking! If you haven’t decided where to go this fall, this is your chance to ask questions, get to know our campus, and learn how North Park is the right fit for you.

Guests will experience the feeling of community at North Park. You’ll hear why current students fell in love with life on our campus and get to meet your future classmates. Learn everything you need to know about orientation, financial aid, housing, advising, and class registration so that you’re prepared to take the next steps in your college search journey.

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February Viking Preview Day

Viking Preview Days offer you a firsthand taste of the North Park University experience by allowing you to connect with our community and learn about our vibrant student life. Viking Preview Days are an ideal opportunity for students to take the next step in their college journey and discover what makes North Park special.

Highlights:
-Attend “Coffee with Coaches” and learn more about Viking Athletics (optional)
-Explore our campus oasis on a tour led by North Park students
-Get all your questions answered about your admissions application and financial aid

RSVP

Event Schedule

November Viking Preview Day

Viking Preview Days offer you a firsthand taste of the North Park University experience by allowing you to connect with our community and learn about our vibrant student life. Viking Preview Days are an ideal opportunity for students to take the next step in their college journey and discover what makes North Park special.

Highlights:
-Attend “Coffee with Coaches” and learn more about Viking Athletics (optional)
-Are you a first-generation college student? Attend a session designed just for you! (optional)
-Connect with faculty from your intended major
-Explore our campus oasis on a tour led by North Park students
-Get all your questions answered about your admissions application and financial aid

RSVP Schedule

October Viking Preview Day

Viking Preview Days offers you a firsthand taste of the North Park University experience by allowing you to connect with our community and learn about our vibrant student life. Viking Preview Days are an ideal opportunity for students to take the next step in their college journey and discover what makes North Park special.

Highlights:
-Attend “Coffee with Coaches” and learn more about Viking Athletics (optional)
-Are you a first-generation college student? Attend a session designed just for you!
-Connect with faculty from your intended major
-Explore our campus oasis on a tour led by North Park students
-Get all your questions answered about your admissions application and financial aid

REGISTER Schedule

Fall Visit Day

Join us for Fall Visit Day and get an in-depth look at the classroom experience. Students and their families are welcome to explore our beautiful Chicago campus and learn about the value of a North Park education.

Highlights:

-Learn from our accomplished faculty and experience our innovative academic programs firsthand
-Tour our state-of-art science labs including, but not limited to Nursing Sim Lab and Carlson Athletic Training Center
-Pick and choose your activities from a list of hands-on workshops led by faculty
-Take a student-led campus tour of our urban oasis

RSVP Here!   SCHEDULE

A Catalyst Excursion: Engaging History and Intercultural Context Through Pilsen’s Murals

Every Wednesday, various Catalyst classes take excursions into the city, exploring topics of study through the lens of first-hand experience. On a recent excursion to the Pilsen neighborhood, Professor Lee Strickland’s Street Art class was treated to an in-depth tour of the area’s vibrant murals.

Every Wednesday, various Catalyst classes take excursions into the city, exploring topics of study through the lens of first-hand experience. On a recent excursion to the Pilsen neighborhood, Professor Lee Strickland’s Street Art class (a Keystone-3000 course) was treated to an in-depth tour of the area’s vibrant murals. Their knowledgeable tour guide, Luis Tubens from the National Museum of Mexican Art, was a powerhouse of insight, offering cultural and historical context to the artwork as well as relating the content to the day-to-day life of the community.

Tubens explained that while Pilsen was once largely populated by Polish and Czech immigrants, the 1960s brought major developments in infrastructure to neighboring areas which in turn displaced a large Latino population to Pilsen. For many, this forced migration echoed a longer journey. Gulliver en el pais de las Maravillas / Gulliver in Wonderland, a mural which stretches around the artist Hector Duarte’s home and studio, speaks poignantly to the immigrant’s journey and to the struggle of integrating into a new culture.

In addition to local history, Tubens discussed the history of murals and the role they have played in shaping communities and empowering their people. At the Orozco Community Academy, a venetian glass mosaic by Francisco Mendoza offered Tubens the perfect opportunity to discuss the Mexican mural movement led by Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente, and David Alfaro Siqueiros. A few blocks away the work of contemporary artist, Sentrock, provided a bold example of pop art giving voice to a new generation. Some murals spoke to social challenges such as gun violence or conflicting cultural identities, while others represented the community efforts to address these challenges.

Professor Strickland says her class is not made up of art majors but, rather, many of them are studying political science or criminal justice. Her Street Art class is an opportunity for students to address what they are learning in their major studies through a completely different lens.

Learn More about Catalyst

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Jamey Lundblad C’95: Chief Marketing Officer, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events

“Chicago is an arts powerhouse and global cultural destination . . . I’m passionate about making the arts and local culture available to Chicagoans and visitors.”

After graduation, Lundblad got his career off the ground as an editor and event planner for North Park. Then he moved on to roles at marketing agency VSA Partners and as director of marketing for the Chicago Public Library. Now, as chief marketing officer for the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, his job is to promote the city’s many cultural offerings. It’s one he relishes. “What really shaped me were my experiences outside the classroom and around the world.”

“Chicago is an arts powerhouse and global cultural destination . . . I’m passionate about making the arts and local culture available to Chicagoans and visitors.”

—Jamey Lundblad C’95: Chief Marketing Officer, City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events

Jamey Lundblad C’95 loves Chicago. As chief marketing officer for the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events, his job is to promote the city’s many cultural offerings. It’s one he relishes.

“Chicago is an arts powerhouse and a global cultural destination—the birthplace of the skyscraper and modern architecture, storefront theatre, improv, the urban blues, and more,” Lundblad says. “I’m passionate about making the arts and local culture available to Chicagoans and visitors, and I love going to see exhibits, theatre, and dance myself—every chance I get. So, I’m grateful that my job allows me to advocate for the arts and Chicago every day.”

The communication arts and Swedish double major says North Park prepared him well for his high-profile position with the city, where he’s responsible for marketing Chicago’s many festivals and promoting Millennium Park, the number-one tourist attraction in the Midwest.

“My classes at North Park were terrific and provided a solid foundation for my career,” says the Minnesota native. “But what really shaped me were my experiences outside the classroom and around the world,” including his semester in Sweden and his role as Student Government president his senior year.

“My study abroad in Sweden gave me confidence and a more expansive worldview,” says Lundblad, who was mentored by many beloved North Park professors and staff, including David and Sue Horner, Melissa Morris-Olson, and Charles Peterson, among others.

After graduation, Lundblad got his career off the ground as an editor and event planner for North Park. Then he moved on to roles at marketing agency VSA Partners and as director of marketing for the Chicago Public Library.

Now a frequent world traveler, Lundblad also serves on the board of directors of Edgar Miller Legacy, a group whose mission is to preserve the architect’s “handmade homes” throughout the country, but especially in the Chicagoland area.

In fact, Lundblad and his husband, Bill Melamed, held their recent wedding in the R.W. Glasner Studio, a building designed by Miller, who was known as a master painter, wood carver, and stained-glass maker. Lundblad and Melamed are committed to supporting the arts, as well as a variety of LGBTQ causes.

Lundblad hails from a long line of North Park alumni: his aunt, uncle, brother, and sister-in-law all attended North Park.

“I’m proud to call myself a North Park Legacy,” Lundblad says.

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English Professor Seeks Your Input on Life-changing Literature

Did a novel or other work of literature change your life? If so, North Park English Professor Nancy Arnesen wants to hear from you.

Did a novel or other work of literature change your life? If so, North Park English Professor Nancy Arnesen wants to hear from you.

Dr. Arnesen begins a yearlong sabbatical this summer, exploring the meaning of literature outside the classroom and in the broader world. As part of her research, she would like to hear from former students (along with their friends and family) about how a specific piece of literature changed their lives.

“I’d be interested to hear from alums about a literary work they read in college, or since, that has been important to them in some way,” says Dr. Arnesen, who has taught writing and literature for more than 30 years. “As part of my research, I’ll be asking ‘why bother with literature?’ and ‘how can literature serve the common good?’”

In addition to reading works by authors who examine literature and its relationship to the common good, Dr. Arnesen will be searching out internship opportunities for students as part of North Park’s Catalyst 606__ program, in which Chicago serves as North Park’s extended classroom. To do so, Dr. Arnesen will be spending time exploring Chicago-based clubs and other non-profits that encourage the use of literature as a way to improve people’s lives.

If you’d like to assist Dr. Arnesen with her project, reach out to her at narnesen@northpark.edu.

More About Dr. Arnesen

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Undergrad-led Research Findings Span Academic Majors

Organized by the Undergraduate Research Committee, 25 students present original research at North Park’s 12th annual Undergraduate Research Symposium.

North Park students, faculty, advisors, and family gathered May 2 at the Johnson Center for the 12th annual Undergraduate Research Symposium. Organized by the Undergraduate Research Committee, the 25 student presenters first submitted an abstract to the committee for entrance into the symposium.

“Most of these student scholars conduct their research in their Directed Research course throughout the academic year,” said Dr. Yoojin Choi, chair of the committee. “Students really learn best when doing authentic inquiry,” added Dr. Choi.

As part of the Directed Research course and/or independent studies coursework, the research topics represented students majoring in biology, psychology, exercise science, physics and engineering, nursing, philosophy, environmental science, English, chemistry, and biochemistry.

Eleanor Manning

“This is the best learning experience I’ve had at North Park because we can apply what we’ve learned,” said Eleanor Manning, a physics and engineering major. She credits her understanding of the mechanics of prosthetics to participating in undergraduate Directed Research coursework.

“Conducting research projects is the best way to learn research and it allows our top students to shine,” said Provost Michael O. Emerson.

Exercise science major Victoria Pudussery expressed her gratitude for her learning experience.

“I now have perspective on how large research is and am fortunate to learn the research process as an undergrad,” said Pudussery. Post-graduation, Pudussery will pursue a degree in physical therapy at Northwestern University.

Victoria Pudusserey

Students displayed the practical, career-building skills they acquired at North Park via media such as charts and graphs. Physics and engineering senior Kristina Lundeen illustrated an analysis of wind in her presentation of Improving a Pedestrian Comfort Model for Arbitrary Geometries. Nursing student Aisha Badla presented statistical reporting and data analysis that answered Does Breastfeeding a Neonate Improve Oxygen Saturation Levels Without Any Other Intervention?

Spending hours in North Park’s Brandel Library conducting in-depth research, the participants further developed their critical thinking, case study reading, oral presentation, and confidence in fielding questions from the audience.

“The Undergraduate Research Symposium is a magnificent spotlight on what is great about a North Park education,” said Provost Emerson.

“Most grad schools require research experience in the undergrad years and having the Research Symposium on your CV is very good,” said Dr. Choi. The CV credential is a bonus—but even more, these students displayed true to North Park form their appreciation for research, gratitude to their mentors, and exceptional work ethic.

Acknowledgments

The Undergraduate Research Symposium wishes to thank the students and faculty mentors for their efforts at creating original works of knowledge. This year’s Undergraduate Research Committee consisted of Professors Yoojin Choi, Gianfranco Farruggia, You-Seong Kim, Suzen Moeller, Rachel Schmale, Sarah Thorngate, and Joel Willitts. Special thanks to Brandel Library, Provost Emerson, and Interim President Balsam for their support and for underwriting the cost of the symposium.

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